MARUTHEA

Classification: Space station (see comments) 

Creator: Unrevealed

User/Possessors: Bonjaxx, Death's Head (Minion), Defense Synths, Hob, patrons of Bonjaxx's Bar (Ace, Alpha Centauri, Apocalypse, Dr. Ivan Asimoff, Beep the Meep, Bishop, Bus Conductor, Captain America, Captain Scarlet, Catavolcus, Catweazle, Cheetah Person, Chief, Chumbley, Conan, five Corps members (Captain Britain/Brian Braddock, Captain U.K./Linda McQuillan, others), Crazy Gang (Clown, Knave), Cusick, Cyber Controller, Cybermat, Daleks, Death's Head (Freelance Peacekeeping Agent), the Defender, Destroyer, the Doctor, the Doctor, the Doctor, the Doctor, Doctor Doom, Doctor Octopus, Doctor Strange, Doot, Ferengi, Freefall Warriors (Big Cat, Bruce, Cool Breeze, Machine Head), Giggles, Ghost Rider (Danny Ketch), Hulk, Human Torch, Halbert Jetsam, K1, KalikKandyman, Kether Troop Warheads (Stacy Arnheim, Colonel Tigon Liger, Guillermo Perez), Master, Mekon, Melanicus, Melkur, Meltron, Mister Fantastic, Morbius, Mys-Tech Board (Algernon Crowe, Eadmund Porlock), Ogron, Emma Peel, Axel Pressbutton, Quark, Random, Ria, Rocket Raccoon, Roman Empire Alien Guard, Sapphire, Scarlet Witch, Sensorite, Shayde, Silurian, Silver Surfer, Bart Simpson, Sontaran, Spider-Man, Star Tigers (Abslom Daak, Harma, Vol Mercurius, Salander), John Steed, Steel, Sub-Mariner (Namor MacKenzie), a talking fish, Thing (Ben Grimm), Thor, Vervoid, Vesuvius, Volstagg, Warlock, Adam Warlock, Werelok, White Robot, Wirrn, Wrarth Warrior, Yeti), penguins, Starship Enterprise NCC-1701-D Crew (Worf, others), Tuck, "U.F.O. aliens";
    possibly K-9, Shaman Kahn, Thunderbird 3 crew (Alan Tracy, John Tracy, Scott Tracy)

Location: Dead center of the space/time vortex

First Appearance: (Mentioned) Doctor Who Magazine#143 (December 1988);
    (seen) Doctor Who Magazine#173 (15th May 1991)

Powers/Abilities/Functions: Maruthea serves as a waystation within the space-time vortex, with facilities to host an unspecified but presumably large number of visitors. Anyone who travels between time or realities can stumble across it so long as they aren't actually trying to get there, as apparently can some individuals who are just traversing their local version of outer space (given the presence of ships like Thunderbird 3, which has no deep space or time travel capabilities). Its unusual nature apparently means that it switches form without notice, having been at different junctures a planet with copious swamps and a fully enclosed space station; it may have other forms it can/has taken, but these remain unrecorded.

History:
(Doctor Who Magazine#173) -  Maruthea was an interdimensional travelers' rest stop located at the exact center of the space-time vortex, making it a mecca for travelers from across the Omniverse (see comments). To get to Maruthea, the trick was not to be there at all, and then you were.

(Incomplete Death's Head#12) - An impossible improbability, Maruthea was constantly changing, a planet /space station (see comments). It was a place where the impossible could happen, and often did. 

(Doctor Who Magazine#173) -  One of the popular venues on Maruthea for visitors was Bonjaxx's Bar, owned and run by the Daemon Bonjaxx. The Time Lord known as the Doctor was one of his friends and some of the Doctor's incarnations attended several of the barman's birthday parties (or perhaps a single perpetual party), though the Doctor's seventh persona had yet to make it to one. Maruthea's nature frequently meant old adversaries stumbled across one another there, and this combined with copious amounts of alcohol meant bar fights were not uncommon, much to the annoyance of Bonjaxx. 

(Incomplete Death's Head#9 (fb) - BTS) - When ruthless businessman Josiah Dogbolter tricked Death's Head (F.P.A.) into pursuing the seventh Doctor using an unstable time travel backpack that secretly doubled as a nuclear bomb, the Doctor turned the tables and delivered the bomb back to Dogbolter. Caught in a ground zero thermonuclear blast from a crude time travel device, Dogbolter's faithful robotic aide Hob was thrown into the space-time continuum. Hoping Dogbolter might have similarly survived but unable to locate him, Hob traveled to Maruthea to utilize its unique position in the vortex to record and investigate every moment of Death's Head's life across the myriad times and realities he had visited, intending to use the resultant archive to locate Death's Head and force him to track down and rescue Dogbolter. Since Death's Head was over three million years old, it was a quest that took Hob centuries, ...

(Incomplete Death's Head#1/Incomplete Death's Head#11) - ...and still remained far from complete, with many vital points in Death's Head's long life missing or producing poor quality scans thanks to negative distortions in the vortexial scan waves.

(Incomplete Death's Head#5) - The archive also scanned for and recorded the seventh Doctor's history when it intersected with anyone Death's Head had interacted with, even if the mechanoid wasn't personally present for said events.  

(Doctor Who Magazine#148 (fb) - BTS) - The seventh incarnation of the Doctor decided to visit Maruthea to attend his friend Bonjaxx's birthday party. 

(Doctor Who Magazine#143 - BTS) - Attempting to visit Maruthea, the Doctor instead landed inside a prefabricated building on an alien world. Recognizing that he was in the place, he decided he needed to get his bearings if he wanted to reach Maruthea, and set off to find out where he was; it would turn out to be small human colony on the planet Mekrom. 

(Doctor Who Magazine#144 - BTS) - After helping a Foreign Hazard Duty team resolve a situation in the colony, the Doctor prepared to set off for Maruthea again now that he had his starting location.

(Doctor Who Magazine#145 - BTS) - Trying again to reach Maruthea, the Doctor landed on the planet Tojana, a world where the last remaining land was about to be swallowed by the oceans.

(Doctor Who Magazine#148 - BTS) - Trying yet again to reach Maruthea (see comments) the Doctor instead arrived at London, Earth, circa 1992, during the middle of an invasion by the Gantacs. He burst out of the TARDIS carrying Bonjaxx's present and singing "Happy Birthday" before realizing his mistake. Gantac security swooped in before he could leave, demanding to know who he was, then electroshocked him for giving an unsatisfactory answer, causing him to drop the present. The falling box opened, releasing the intended gift, a cute, tiny, furry juvenile Kar-Parian Ohmodom. One of the Gantacs sadistically decided to execute the creature, ignoring the Doctor's warnings that exposing it to a large electrical discharge was a bad idea. The energy caused the Ohmodom to instantly jolt into its adult phase, a far less cute and much larger creature with vicious fangs, claws and horns. As it chased the Gantacs off, the Doctor noted that this had totally ruined his friend's birthday surprise.

(Doctor Who Magazine#150 - BTS) - After seeing off the Gantac invasion, the Doctor collected the still adult but surprisingly friendly Ohmodom, and said his goodbye to a friend who had assisted him, explaining that he couldn't stay around for the liberation celebrations as he was already a day late for Bonjaxx's party.

(Doctor Who Magazine#151 - BTS) - Still trying to reach Bonjaxx's party on Maruthea, the Doctor instead landed on the planet Archimedes, where the Doctor got dragged into helping a reporter solve a mystery before continuing on his way to the party.

(Doctor Who Magazine#152 - BTS) - STILL trying to reach Bonjaxx's party on Maruthea, the Doctor instead landed on the planet Hell, recently conquered by the Daleks, and teamed with with Dalek-Killer Abslom Daak.

(Incomplete Death's Head#12 (fb) - BTS) - The seventh Doctor, having already attended and left Bonjaxx's party, snatched Death's Head (Minion) and Tuck out of time, then transmatted them into Hob's facility on Maruthea at a point in Maruthea's timeline shortly before his own arrival at the party so the pair could back up the younger Death's Head against the robot and prevent the younger self paradoxically dying before his time.

(Incomplete Death's Head#1) - Death's Head (Minion) and Tuck found themselves unexpectedly transmatted to a strange facility, and within seconds, while still trying to get a grasp of the situation, were attacked by three defense synths (synthetic guards). Swiftly dispatching them, Death's Head and Tuck looked around and found an interactive archive console that could directly interface into the user's cranium. Checking, Death's Head discovered it's entire archive was devoted to studying the life of his past self, the Freelance Protection Agent Death's Head that had existed prior to his consciousness being absorbed into the Minion body.

    He explained to Tuck as it displayed images of his "parents," Lupex and Pyra, and told her how his body had been stolen from them by person from Lupex, programmed with a killer instinct and set up as a bounty hunter on Scarvix, the time of his earliest memories. They watched as the archive recounted his encounter with early opponent Tex, then, while Death's Head continued to watch accounts of his early life, Tuck went over to another set of consoles to see if she could discover where and when they were. However, when she plugged into that console, she found it too was recounting parts of Death's Head's history, learning that an unknown individual had captured the cyborg, transferred him to a universe of warring robots (Reality-120185, home of the Transformers) and reconstructed him as a giant so he could fight them, though the archive's scans of that time in the subject's history were of poor quality thanks to negative distortions in the vortexial scan waves. Continuing the account, the archive related how Death's Head had then been caught in the gravitational well of a collapsing planet (Unicron) and accelerated at trans-temporal speeds into the time-space continuum, until he reached the crossroads of time and encountered the seventh incarnation of the Doctor. The Time Lord shrank him down and teleported him to Earth-5555, circa 8162A.D., where his body was severely damaged in a fight with Dragon's Claws.

   Tuck decided this was a good point to pause the recording and suggest to her partner that they should explore and find more about who was behind the archive, but Death's Head wanted to hold off that concern until he had learned a bit more about his predecessor, whose personality now dominated the Minion body. Suddenly he paused in mid-sentence and began stuttering the same words over again, then to Tuck's horror, his body was electrocuted via the cable plugging him into the archive.

(Incomplete Death's Head#2) - Tuck found that Death's Head was out cold, and couldn't revive him, but since he was still plugged in she correctly deduced his mind remained active reliving his past life. Within the archive, Death's Head (Minion)'s mind woke to be confronted by a virtual representation of his previous body, who mockingly informed him that if he wanted to escape he would need to figure out the identity of the archive's owner from his fragmented memory archive.

(Incomplete Death's Head#3) - Back in the physical world, Tuck continued watching the screens as they displayed the prior Death's Head being found and rebuilt by Spratt. Then, to her surprise, the current Death's Head's face appeared on the screens, explaining that his mind had been sucked into cyberspace. With this new access to the archive, he had learned they were on Maruthea and warned Tuck that it was an unpredictable place. Telling her to find out what she could about who was behind the archive, he promised her that he would be back shortly. As his hologram faded out, Tuck prepared to look around, unaware that a gigantic form (Hob) was looming up behind her.

(Incomplete Death's Head#4) - Unaware she was being watched, Tuck continued to observe past events on the archives, but as she grew frustrated at her lack of progress in her quest, she turned and was confronted by Hob.

(Incomplete Death's Head#5) - Inside the archive, the past Death's Head's simulacrum argued with his successor's displaced mind, and taunted him by showing him that Tuck was being attacked. Explaining that they were cut off from the real world and couldn't help Tuck, he added that he suspected her attacker was whoever was behind their predicament, and told him to watch another account, this time featuring the Doctor and not him, saying it might be important.

(Incomplete Death's Head#6) - As that account ended, Death's Head found himself suddenly attacked by one of the creatures from the memories he had been witnessing. Though he easily killed it, he was disturbed to realize that in the virtual world his memories could literally come alive and threaten him. Out in the real world, Hob finished subduing Tuck, and learned they had been reviewing his archive.

(Incomplete Death's Head#7) - Not recognizing the Minion body to be his old foe, Hob hoisted the barely conscious Tuck aloft by her hair and informed her that she had meddled in information that did not concern her. He was about to destroy her until he heard her mumbling in confusion, asking Death's Head to wake up. Upon hearing that name, Hob demanded to know how the unfamiliar-looking cyborg could be Death's Head, and moved ominously towards his inert and defenseless body.

(Incomplete Death's Head#8) - As Tuck regained her senses, the distracted Hob examined the cyborg on the floor. Tuck explained that though he might not recognize him, since the archive made it clear he had known the past Death's Head, the unconscious body was still Death's Head, just in a new form. Leaning forward for a closer look, Hob expressed his fascination at finally finding his target, but stopped talking when Tuck suddenly held her crossbow to his head and demanded answers.

(Incomplete Death's Head#9) - Hob played Tuck the account of his encounter with Death's Head (F.P.A.) and the seventh Doctor, which had ended with him and his beloved master Dogbolter being caught in a nuclear explosion. He explained how this had unexpectedly thrown him across the space-time continuum, and how he had subsequently made his way to Maruthea to use it's unique position within the vortex to allow him to record Death's Head's history, hoping to locate the cyborg and force him in turn to find the missing Dogbolter. Now however, Death's Head had come to him. Contemptuously pointing out he had survived a ground zero nuclear blast, he told her to put down her weapon, as it couldn't harm him.

(Incomplete Death's Head#10) - Ignoring Hob's warning, Tuck fired on him repeatedly, but her foe was proven right in his belief that her weapon could do him no harm. Dodging his lunge, she suggested that maybe the reason he had failed to locate Dogbolter despite scouring space-time for signs of his master might be because Dogbolter might have been completely wiped from the time stream by the explosion. Truly enraged, Hob screamed that he would destroy her for suggesting such an evil thought.

simultaneously...

(Doctor Who Magazine#173 (fb) - BTS) - Many of the Doctor's incarnations including the sixth visited Maruthea to attend Bonjaxx's current birthday party, each dropping off presents then departing after a little while, possibly because the bar was full of individuals he had clashed with. Around the same time the Starship Enterprise (NCC1701-D), Thunderbird 3, Big Cat's Tigerfire, the Star Tigers' Kill-Wagon and a U.F.O. also docked at the station. Big Cat, Worf from the Enterprise and the Star Tigers (Abslom Daak, Harma, Mercurius and Salander) all hit Bonjaxx's for a drink, sharing the venue with Cat's fellow Freefall Warriors, five members of the Corps, a Silurian, Bart Simpson, Shayde, Steel and Sapphire, an Ogron, a Werelok, Axel Pressbutton, Doctor Ivan Asimoff, a robotic Bus Conductor, two Daleks, a Wrarth warrior, a Sontaran, a Melkur, a Ferengi, the Hulk, Melanicus, a Quark, the Silver Surfer, Adam Warlock, Timespirits Cusick and Doot and their nemesis the talking fish, a Vervoid, Giggles of the Cherubim, Catweazle, Captain Scarlet, the Destroyer, Jetsam, the Chief cybernetic cannibal, Morbius, the Master, the Mekon, Catavolcus, a robot Alien Guard member, Alpha Centauri, the Defender, a Cheetah Person, the Cyber Controller, a Yeti robot (and by extrapolation the Great Intelligence), a Sensorite, Vesuvius, the Kandyman, the Giant Robot K1, a White Robot, a Chumbley, Emma Peel and John Steed, Meltron, and a Wirrn...

(Incomplete Death's Head#11 (fb)) - as well as Rocket Raccoon, Random, Captain America, the Scarlet Witch, Doctor Doom, Doctor Strange, Namor, the Crazy Gang, Thor, Doctor Octopus, the Human Torch, the Thing, Mister Fantastic, Volstagg, Warlock, Conan,...

(Incomplete Death's Head#12) - ...Ghost Rider, Spider-Man, Bishop, some of the Mys-Tech Board, Kether Troop Warheads and Apocalypse. 

(Incomplete Death's Head#11) - Inside the virtual realm, the two Death's Heads finished watching an account of the original's encounter with Arno Stark and the return of Big Shot. When Big Shot suddenly attacked, the newer Death's Head quickly subdued him, prompting his predecessor to note that he seemed to be getting the hang of controlling their environment. The newer Death's Head responded that he was using his predecessor's own ability to do so, since the past Death's Head was part of him. The virtual past Death's Head told him not to dwell on how he had come to reside in his new body, explaining that it was missing from Hob's account, which was why Hob knew nothing about him. The virtual Death's Head noted that there were other gaps: Hob possessed no information about Death's Head killing Lupex, nor had he any idea who had been responsible for kidnapping him and sending him into the robot (Transformer) wars (in Reality-120185).

(Doctor Who Magazine#173) - The seventh Doctor and his companion Ace finally arrived on Maruthea for Bonjaxx's Birthday party, their TARDIS materializing on the concourse next to an identical TARDIS whose mostly unseen sixth Doctor was kicking a penguin out of his vehicle, angrily querying why it thought a friend of his inside the TARDIS. While the kicked penguin was offered consolation for its ordeal by three others of its kind, the seventh Doctor stepped out of his vehicle and spotted the other TARDIS dematerializing; he commented to Ace that anything could happen here and often did. The Doctor and Ace entered the nearby bar, and the Time Lord greeted Bonjaxx.

(Incomplete Death's Head#11) - Meanwhile in cyberspace, the virtual Death's Head stated that he hated mysteries, pointing out that there was also no record of his visit to Maruthea, or why Hob hadn't tried to capture him during that visit. Even as he said this, the archive announced it had found new information, and displayed Death's Head (F.P.A.) parking his stolen T.V.A. Time Cycle outside Bonjaxx's Bar, next to the Fantastic Four's Rosebud II, and entering to find the party in full flow. In the virtual realm, the newer Death's Head noted that the reason there had been no record of the visit in the archive was because it hadn't happened until now, and wondered if Hob had noticed his younger self's arrival.

   Back in the real world, Hob was so caught up in his rant at Tuck for suggesting Dogbolter could be dead after having spent centuries searching for him that he failed to notice the archive trying to alert him to its new discovery, and so missed seeing Death's Head enter the bar and head for a table, passing by the Doctor standing in by the door. As Hob grabbed Tuck, she tried to distract him by pointing out the archive's bleeping, leading him to finally pay attention to the latest archive, and spot that the Death's Head he knew was on Maruthea.  

(Doctor Who Magazine#173) - Back in the bar, the Doctor handed over a small wrapped present, admitting it wasn't exactly what he had intended to gift. Graciously stating that it would be perfect and that he was touched, the barcreature offered the Doctor a drink, and added his gift to a large pile of varyingly shaped but identically wrapped presents. When he commented to his friend that someone had been looking for the Doctor earlier (see comments), the Doctor glanced round at the packed bar full of old friends and foes and asked if it had been anyone in particular.

    The Doctor and Ace seated themselves at a table with the Hulk and a Ferengi at adjacent tables, with the Doctor wondering aloud who could have known he was there. Spotting Death's Head counting a large pile of cash at a nearby table and glancing their way, Ace suggested it might be the cyborg. Looking over as Death's Head raised his cocktail in salute, the Doctor agreed that he supposed he could call the bounty hunter a friend...he hoped. Then Ace spotted a couple heading their way and asked the Doctor if it might be them. Turning, the seventh Doctor found a balding man holding a cup of tea behind him, and though he didn't recall the face, recognition hit within a few seconds, and he warmly greeted his future self.

(Incomplete Death's Head#12) - Watching from afar as Death's Head got up from his table and walked past the Time Lord(s) to the bar, Hob cackled in glee at finally having both his enemies together and near him (unaware that he was also seeing the Doctor's future version), anticipating that he would finally be able to retrieve his lost master and restore sanity to his universe. 

(Doctor Who Magazine#173) - In the bar, the respective companions Ace and Ria introduced themselves to one another as the Time Lord talked to himself, but their pleasantries were interrupted as a drunken Beep the Meep stumbled into the future Doctor on his way to confront the Freefall Warriors. Having wandered across to the bar, Death's Head noticed the Warriors rising from their chairs to respond to the Meep's approach and gleefully anticipated that mayhem was about to ensue. Less appreciative at the thought of yet another bar fight, especially during his own party, Bonjaxx tried to leap the bar to intervene as Cool Breeze and Bruce punched the inebriated Meep onto the through a table, but drunkenly caught his hoof on the counter and crashed into Abslom Daak. Within seconds a mass brawl pulled in most of the bar, though the Doctors continued to chat as if nothing was amiss; clearly enjoying herself, Ria tried to include them by throwing a beer glass at the pair, but the seventh Doctor casually blocked it by opening his umbrella without even glancing in her direction. Looking over at the melee, the two Doctors agreed it was time to depart, collected their respective companions, thanked their still stunned host for the party, and calmly walked out and back to their TARDIS(es). In the bar, Bonjaxx pulled himself up and avowed it was always nice to see the Doctor again. Suddenly hearing the vworping sound of an arriving TARDIS, Bonjaxx added "and again" just before the fourth Doctor stuck his head of the newly materialized time vessel's door, and asked if he had arrived at Brighton Pavilion.

(Doctor Who Magazine#173 - BTS) - Realizing it wasn't Brighton Pavilion, the fourth Doctor left almost immediately (see comments).        

(Incomplete Death's Head#12 - BTS) - Having a nagging suspicion there had been a reason to visit Maruthea other than attending Bonjaxx's party, the seventh Doctor eventually (seemingly following Ace's departure from the TARDIS, several years after the party) recalled that he had to stop Hob from creating a paradox by destroying F.P.A. Death's Head before his appointed demise fighting Minion, so he snatched Minion Death's Head and Tuck out of time and transmatted them to Maruthea at a point prior to the party.  

(Incomplete Death's Head#12) - In cyberspace the virtual past Death's Head and disembodied newer version watched the Doctors depart and noted Hob would not be pleased; more worryingly, the real world Death's Head (F.P.A.) was still at the party, unaware of the impending danger. The virtual F.P.A. Death's Head concurred, noting that he didn't recall what happened to that real world version next, putting this down to the confusion caused by time traveling and recalling his time working for the T.V.A., but Minion Death's Head interrupted his reminiscing to remind him that Tuck was still in Hob's clutches and imminent danger. His virtual version explained that Hob wanted to force him to find Dogbolter, which Minion stated was impossible, so virtual Death's Head added "or kill me." Minion responded that this was impossible, since he, the future incarnation of Death's Head, had already done so. The virtual one countered that he should have listened to the Doctor during the recent archive; being outside of time, anything was possible on Maruthea, which is exactly why Hob had come there after being blasted into the space-time vortex.

    Virtual Death's Head played his future self a memory to demonstrate how time could be changed, but Minion retorted that he'd played the lead in enough paradoxes to know this. Watching the real world through their interface, they saw Bonjaxx's patrons watching with curiosity as Hob approached the bar, and Minion expressed his concern again that Tuck looked to only have seconds of life left. Virtual Death's Head informed himself that he had worked out how to shunt his future self back into his real-world body, and would do so if future Death's Head promised to prevent Hob from killing the real world F.P.A. Death's Head.

    In the real world, Hob took a few minutes to play with past Death's Head, tormenting the captive Tuck with comments how fleshlings were so easily broken, and taunting past Death's Head for not being capable of putting up a decent fight. The F.P.A. Death's Head responded that he was just getting warmed up, when someone behind Hob called out the robot's name. As Hob turned in confusion, the Minion Death's Head sliced off the arm holding Tuck, freeing her. As the two Death's Heads moved to stand together, Captain Britain stepped forward to offer his assistance, but the cyborgs told him to back off, insisting this was their fight. The earlier Death's Head glanced at the newcomer with confusion, querying why Tuck had called the interloper by his trademarked name, but Tuck suggested they leave the questions for later, as Hob's massive form disgorged multiple large guns. Activating their own blasters in response, the two Death's Heads ran at Hob firing in unison, eerily mirroring one another's movements, then switched to blades as they reached their opponent. Despite Hob's claims of being indestructible, the twin cyborgs made short work of him, slicing him to pieces.

    Returning to his questions now that the threat was dealt with, F.P.A. Death's Head became angered when Tuck tried to explain that he and the newcomer were the same, and was about to attack his future self when he was shocked into unconsciousness from behind by the returned seventh Doctor. He explained to the annoyed Minion Death's Head that he had stunned the younger version and was now wiping his memories of the encounter to prevent a paradox, since he couldn't be allowed to recall a meeting with his older self that the older self didn't remember happening. Unsatisfied with this explanation, the Minion Death's Head demanded to know what had been going on, and the Doctor admitted that he had been making "editorial alterations to the career" of the younger Death's Head, and had been responsible for sending him to the Transformer's reality, as well as "shaping" some of his other adventures to make him a better person. Seeing the Minion Death's Head  becoming angry at the thought of having his life manipulated, the Doctor reassured him that the only thing he had done since Death's Head transferred into the Minion body was to transport him and Tuck to Maruthea in order to ensure younger Death's Head's survival.

    The Minion Death's Head begrudgingly thanked him for this, but made it clear that if he ever caught the Doctor manipulating him again, he'd kill him repeatedly until he ran out of regenerations. Accepting this as a fair comment, the Doctor offered to stand the pair for a drink at the party, but the cyborg grumpily declined. Tuck suggested they might take him up on his offer another time, and the Time Lord told her that if she ever wanted another partner she was welcome to look him up. Thanking him, Tuck kissed him on the cheek and promised she would take him up on the offer some time. The Doctor watched as she chased after her cantankerous partner and the pair transmatted away. Wishing the departed Death's Head good luck, the Doctor then hauled the still unconscious F.P.A. version up by his shoulders and towards the bar, suggesting that a party might pick his spirits up.

Comments: Created by Dan Abnett (first mention), Garry Russell, Mike Collins and Steve Pini.

   Maruthea isn't described explicitly as getting visitors from across the Omniverse, but between its location and the attendees at Bonjaxx's party, it seems fairly obvious. Why the Omniverse and not the Multiverse? Again, the range of attendees, many of whom are neither from the Marvel multiverse nor Doctor Who multiverse.

    That's no moon, it's a space station: A few inconsistencies arose about Maruthea between its early mentions and actual appearance, probably because the Doctor constantly trying to get there only to land in the wrong place had originally just been planned as a running joke, so nobody had planned ahead what exactly Maruthea was. In DWM#148, the Doctor describes Maruthea as a planet, rather than a space station, and claims he can tell that his current location isn't Maruthea because there's "not enough swamps," suggesting that Maruthea should have quite a few. Then in Incomplete Death's Head they keep referring to Maruthea being a planet, despite it looking very much like a space station when we actually see it - unless perhaps it is a planet that was enclosed within a space station so it could be moved into the space-time vortex. Additionally for the inconsistencies, in DWM#151's prose story "The Infinity Season" it is spelled Marathea. Perhaps because after calling Maruthea a planet for the first eleven issues of Incomplete Death's Head they realized when they finally reprinted the DWM#173 story in IDH#11 that they'd depicted it as a space station, the final issue of that miniseries offers an out, saying it is a constantly changing planet/space station.

    Doctor's making house (bar) calls: When the seventh Doctor arrives at Bonjaxx's, he gives his friend a gift wrapped in a distinctive paper; Bonjaxx places it behind the bar on a pile of around seventeen other presents, all different shapes but all wrapped in the exact same paper, suggesting that not only have other incarnations of the Doctor been to his parties, they've all been to this party. One of the gifts is clearly shaped like the Doctor's robotic friend K-9, and the Doctor's been known to gift some friends their own versions of the robotic dog. As the seventh Doctor's TARDIS materializes outside the bar, we see another TARDIS whose owner, unseen bar his leg, is busy kicking some penguins out of his vehicle, angrily querying why they would think a friend of theirs would be inside; the striped trousers suggest this is either the fifth or sixth Doctors (the latter of whom did travel with a shapeshifter who frequently wore the form of a penguin) but since it was originally a black and white strip, we don't have a color scheme to narrow it down to the specific incarnation - the colorized reprint in Incomplete Death's Head doesn't help, as it leaves the legs black and white, which doesn't fit either fifth or sixth Doctors. That said, the temper fits the sixth Doctor better than the fifth.

    Bonjaxx informed the seventh Doctor that someone had been looking for him earlier, but it's not confirmed who that might have been. It had to be someone looking specifically for the seventh incarnation, since we know another Doctor has just left, and it's implied via the presents that several others have been there too. Since Death's Head enters after the Doctor (as confirmed by a panel in Incomplete Death's Head#11), it wasn't him, and it's unlikely to have been any of the patrons present who made no attempt to chat or attack once the seventh arrived. It's probable but not explicitly confirmed that it was the nth Doctor, since he and Ria were the only people who did come over to talk, but equally that might just have been politeness - it's rude to ignore oneself. Other stories establish that when different incarnations meet, the younger versions generally lose their memories of such encounters once they part company, thanks to timelines being "out of synch." On the rare occasions when they do recall such meetings, it causes problems for the older version, who has to ensure that every word, deed and outcome happens exactly as they recall it happening to avoid a change that will cause a massive time-rupturing paradox. So it is possible that the nth Doctor remembered meeting the seventh at Bonjaxx's, and thus had to ensure the meeting took place. 

    We don't see the fourth Doctor depart immediately after arriving, but since he's not visibly present when the two Death's Head join forces to fight Hob, it seems a fair assumption. 

    Time gentlemen, please: It's worth mentioning that because Maruthea is in the time-space vortex, not everyone present is meeting one another in the same personal chronological order. Apart from the obvious cases - two different incarnations of Death's Head and two of the Doctor being present simultaneously (with another two Doctors bracketing them), we've also got the seventh Doctor's meeting the Star Tigers out of synch (for him, the sequence is DWM#152-155/Nemesis of the Daleks, DWM#173/Party Animals, DWM#197-202/Emperor of the Daleks, while for them the sequence is Party Animals, Nemesis, Emperor), plus the seventh Doctor's timeline loops itself on Maruthea - he arrives to attend the party and spots Death's Head (F.P.A.) as depicted in DWM#173/Party Animals, leaves, then remembers that he had a problem to resolve on Maruthea during the period he's already present, so he sends Death's Head (Minion) and Tuck to Maruthea a few hours before the story in Party Animals began, monitors them from afar (presumably so as to avoid crossing his own timestream - meeting himself in different incarnations is one thing, but since younger seventh Doctor didn't see older seventh Doctor, older seventh can't risk causing a paradox by showing up and being seen by younger seventh), then shows up once his earlier (seventh) self has gone. Time travel - ugh!

    Where everybody knows your name: There's a lot more sub-profiles than your average Appendix entry, thanks to the insane number of cameos. A few other sites that cover the Party Animals story list characters, but that's not really any help if you aren't familiar with those characters to begin with, or you are left going "I know it says Spider-Man was there, but I can't find him." So I've tried to cover everyone. The only people who don't have subprofiles below are characters who already have an Appendix entry, and that Appendix entry depicts the panel they turned up in for Party Animals (Mekon, Emma Peel, John Steed) or they are such major participants in the story that it's easy to spot them (Ria, Ace, Bonjaxx, either Death's Head, Tuck, Beep the Meep, Hob). If the character has an Appendix entry but might be missed in the crowd, then I've given them a subprofile showing them in attendance (especially as some of the main Appendix entries overlook the tiny cameos here; the image list at the bottom of the page allows you to see exactly which page and panel they showed up on), with a link to their Appendix profile in the subprofile. And obviously, anyone who doesn't have a profile elsewhere on the site gets a subprofile here too. For the non-Marvel characters, I've included a clearer image of them from one of their other appearances, since many of the cameos are either obscured by other characters partially blocking the reader's view, or might be up for debate. Feel free to challenge any identifications you think I have wrong!
    Also worth noting that since we're not 100% certain that the characters seen as the mainstream ones, we're also not sure that they have the same name as the mainstream versions...however, since we're assuming that this was indeed the intent of the writer(s), we did not put every single person not identified by name in quotations.

   The sub-profile appearance listings vary depending on where the characters originated. Characters and species who originated on television shows only have appearances where they appeared in Marvel titles, in Doctor Who Magazine, or alongside Marvel or Doctor Who characters in another company's titles listed; this entry is ridiculously long as is, and if I listed every appearance Daleks, Sontarans, Worf, etc. had across ALL media it would be completely out of control. Characters who cameo from regular Marvel titles, like the Hulk, etc., only have their Doctor Who-related appearances listed, again because listing every appearance they've had would be ridiculously unwieldy. Characters who originated in Doctor Who Weekly/Monthly/Magazine get a full listing, including where they've turned up outside of Marvel and Doctor Who comics.

   A last note on the cameos. Other sites have, not incorrectly, pointed out that we don't know for sure that it was Beep the Meep who turned up in Party Animals; truthfully, all Meeps look much alike to human eyes. Likewise they note the characters I've identified as Harma could be just any Ice Warrior, and Salander might be any Draconian. However, the only Meep the readers have ever had any real involvement with was Beep, and not only is Abslom Daak present, but so is the Star Tigers' Kill-Wagon, so I don't think it's unwarranted to ASSume that the three individuals seen aren't just generic members of their respective alien species. Ironically, the same sites who cast doubt on these identifications have no problem saying the Werelok seen in the story is Brill, despite there being a numerical discrepancy with the number on the Werelok's skull cap.      

Profile by Loki.

CLARIFICATIONS:
Maruthea has no known connections to:

Bonjaxx's Bar has no known connections to:

Apocalypse, Stacy Arnheim, Bishop, Captain America, Captain Britain, Clown, Conan, Algernon Crowe, Doctor Doom, Doctor Octopus, Doctor Strange, Giggles, Ghost Rider, Hulk, Human Torch, Knave, Colonel Tigon Liger, Mister Fantastic, Guillermo Perez, Eadmund Porlock, Random, Rocket Raccoon, Scarlet Witch, Silver Surfer, Spider-Man, Sub-Mariner, Thing, Thor, Volstagg, Warlock and Adam Warlock might be their 616 versions and if not are certainly alternate reality counterparts of those characters, but have no known connections to:

Catavolcus, Captain U.K., Crazy Gang, the Doctor, Kether Troop Warheads, Melanicus, Mys-Tech, Shayde and Bart Simpson have their own Appendix entries or sub-profiles - see those for their clarifications

Alpha Centauri has no known connections to:

Ivan Asimoff has no known connections to:

Big Cat has no known connections to:

Bruce has no known connections to:

The Bus Conductor has no known connections to:

Captain Scarlet has no known connections to:

Catweazle has no known connections to:

Cheetah People have no known connections to:

The Chief has no known connections to:

Chumblies have no known connections to:

Cool Breeze has no known connections to:

Cusick has no known connections to:

Cyber Controllers have no known connections to:

Cybermats have no known connections to:

Abslom Daak has no known connections to:

Daleks have no known connections to:

The Defender has no known connections to:

Defense Synths have no known connections to:

The Destroyer has no known connections to:

Doot has no known connections to:

Ferengi have no known connections to:

The Freefall Warriors have no known connections to:

Harma has no known connections to:

Shaman Kahn has no known connections to:

Halbert Jetsam has no known connections to:

Giant Robot K1 has no known connections to:

K-9 has no known connections to:

The Kalik have no known connections to:

The Kandyman has no known connections to:

The Kill-Wagon has no known connections to:

Machine Head has no known connections to:

The Master has no known connections to:

The Melkur have no known connections to:

Meltron has no known connections to:

Vol Mercurius has no known connections to:

Morbius has no known connections to:

Ogrons have no known connections to:

Penguins have no known connections to:

Axel Pressbutton has no known connections to:

Quarks have no known connections to:

Rosebud II has no known connections to:

The Roman Empire's Alien Guard have no known connections to:

Salander has no known connections to:

Sapphire has no known connections to:

Sensorites have no known connections to:

Silurians have no known connections to:

Sontarans have no known connections to:

The Starship Enterprise NCC 1701-D has no known connections to:

The Star Tigers have no known connections to:

Steel has no known connections to:

A talking fish has no known connections to:

Thunderbird 3 has no known connections to:

Tigerfire has no known connections to:

Alan Tracy, John Tracy and Scott Tracy have no known connections to:

The T.V.A. Time Cycle has no known connections to:

U.F.O. and its Aliens have no known connections to:

Vervoids have no known connections to:

Vesuvius has no known connections to:

Werelox have no known connections to:

White Robots have no known connections to:

Wirrn have no known connections to:

Worf has no known connections to:

Wrarth Warriors have no known connections to:

Yeti have no known connections to:


Bonjaxx's Bar

Owned and operated by the Daemon Bonjaxx, Bonjaxx's Bar catered to a clientele visiting from across the Omniverse.

The bar seemed surprisingly peaceful, given that so many beings and individuals who were normally extremely hostile to one another congregated side by side without immediately coming to blows.

    However, it only took a single spark to ignite massive brawls, so old tensions clearly simmered below the surface.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173  (Incomplete Death's Head#11-12


Alpha Centauri

Known only to humanoids by his species'/home system's name, Alpha Centauri was an exceptionally long lived Galactic Federation delegate. In 1881 he responded to a distress call set by the twelfth Doctor on behalf of Martian Ice Warriors led by Empress Iraxxa, and welcomed the aliens into the Federation; because he only spoke to Iraxxa over a broadcast, he did not then encounter the Doctor.

    A couple of thousand years later he was part of the delegation that visited the planet Peladon when they applied for membership, at which time he befriended the Doctor's third incarnation. Alpha Centauri remained on Peladon for a few centuries after that, encountering the third Doctor at least twice more, the seventh at least twice (once on Peladon, and once as a guest at the wedding of the Doctor's friend Bernice Summerfield to Jason Kane), the tenth at least once, and the fifth shortly before Alpha Centauri's retirement in the 41st century A.D.

   It is uncertain at what point in his lengthy life Alpha Centauri visited Maruthea, where he got caught up in a barroom brawl and ended up stunned (or perhaps merely very drunk) on the floor of Bonjaxx's.

Comments: Created by Brian Hayles. Alpha Centauri first appeared in the Doctor Who television story The Curse of Peladon on 29th January 1972, and has appeared a further two times on the TV series, in a couple of novels, in a couple of audio plays, and in one Titan Doctor Who comic, Cold-Blooded War. This cameo is his only appearance thus far in Marvel as far as I know.

   As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain this is the "main" Alpha Centauri, nor can we even be sure it isn't simply another of his species (though wearing a matching cloak to the one from the TV show does suggest that it's the same individual). However, Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" Alpha Centauri, and that's presumably what the artist intended with his cameos, so I choose to treat as such unless new information comes to light contradicting the possibility. 

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Apocalypse

Apocalypse visited Maruthea and Bonjaxx's bar, and witnessed the seventh Doctor pulling an unconscious Death's Head (FPA) back into Bonjaxx's bar in the aftermath of the battle between the two Death's Heads versus Hob.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Apocalypse (En Sabah Nur), though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.  

--Incomplete Death's Head#12


Dr. Ivan Asimoff

    A timid science-fiction author, Dr. Ivan Asimoff was the creator of space adventurer Commander Courage. He ran into and befriended the fourth Doctor and the Freefall Warriors while attending the Festival of the Five Planets, and later encountered the sixth Doctor and his companion Frobisher while campaigning to save the zyglot Polly from being held in captivity.

    While visiting Maruthea he was approached by the robotic Bus Conductor (perhaps having reached the station via some sort of commercial transport for which he needed a ticket), and when the brawl broke out he was attacked by the Defender robot, who he had previously run foul of while trying to rescue Polly.

Comments: Created by Steve Parkhouse and Dave Gibbons, Asimoff debuted in the fourth Doctor story The Freefall Warriors in Doctor Who Monthly#56. He returned for a solo story in Doctor Who Summer Special 1982, and then for the sixth Doctor tale Polly the Glot in Doctor Who Magazine#95.  

   Like everyone else on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain this is the "main" Asimoff, but Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one, and that's presumably what the artist intended with his cameos, so I choose to treat as such unless new information comes to light contradicting the possibility.

   In case it's not obvious, his name and career reveal him to be a homage to noted SF author Isaac Asimov.  

--Doctor Who Monthly#56 (Doctor Who Monthly#57, Doctor Who Summer Special 1982, Doctor Who Magazine#95-97, 173


Bishop

A version of Bishop attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the Lucas Bishop who traveled from his Reality-1191's late 21st century to modern era Earth-616, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.  

--Incomplete Death's Head#12


Bus Conductor

Robotic bus conductors were used by some interstellar travel companies.

    The seventh Doctor encountered one on the planet Segonax, and his companion Ace blew it up when it proved to have been modified to be murderously hostile.

   A bus conductor, presumably a different one, was present in Bonjaxx's Bar on Maruthea, where it appeared to be requesting to see Ivan Asimoff's ticket.

 

Comments: Created by Stephen Wyatt, the Bus Conductor debuted in the Doctor Who television story The Greatest Show in the Galaxy on 14th December 1988.

 

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Captain America

A version of Captain America attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Captain America (or even that his name is exactly that, and not some variation on it), though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

    Given that the artist clearly intended it to be a Captain America cameo, I'm willing to assume that's his name at least, even if it might not be 616 Cap. 

--Incomplete Death's Head#11


Captain Scarlet

In 2068 A.D., Earth accidentally incited a war with the Mysterons, a mysterious race of sentient computers residing on Mars. With the Mysterons preferring strategic assaults to all out attack, the organization Spectrum was tasked defending Earth from their machinations. Each Spectrum operative was coded by color, with Paul Metcalfe designated Captain Scarlet. Assigned to protect the Earth President while he was en route to Spectrum HQ, Metcalfe was killed when the Mysterons engineered a car crash; the aliens then created a doppelganger programmed to carry out their orders and act as their covert agent. However, when Scarlet's best friend, Captain Blue (Adam Svenson) shot the doppelganger, causing him to drop hundreds of feet off a high-rise parking structure, this broke the Mysterons' control. Retaining Metcalfe's memories, the indestructible Captain Scarlet returned to the fold as Spectrum's most dangerous operative.  

Captain Scarlet attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea, taking a seat at a table where the Hulk was drinking; perhaps only an indestructible man was willing to share close proximity with a drunken green goliath.

Comments: Created by Gerry and Sylvia Anderson, Captain Scarlet debuted in the Supermarionation (puppet) series Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons on 29th September 1967. The two Andersons' Century 21 company had a comics branch as well as a television production side, so months before the show aired comic strip tie-ins had begun to appear as early as January 21st 1967 with The New Lady Penelope#53's The Angels. Scarlet himself made his comic debut in TV Century 21#141 on 30th September 1967.

    He's not very clearly shown in Party Animals, but can be recognized by the distinctive epaulettes and pointy shoulderpads of his uniform; additionally, the Incomplete Death's Head reprint correctly colors his tunic red, which also helps with the identification. 

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Catavolcus

 

Catavolcus, leader of the Neutron Knights, visited Maruthea and was at Bonjaxx's bar with his master Melanicus.

    When the brawl broke out, he was punched out by Abslom Daak.

 

Comments: Created by Steve Parkhouse and Dave Gibbons.

   I've seen some comments online that this is only guaranteed to be a Neutron Knight, not Catavolcus, I guess because he was apparently killed during the story that introduced him. While that's certainly true, it overlooks the point that Catavolcus explicitly had the power to travel through time, an ability that would allow him to be at Maruthea, and which wasn't stated to be shared by his Neutron Knight followers. Plus the Neutron Knights bar Catavolcus were always shown wearing helmets, unlike the unhelmeted and bearded Catavolcus and the unhelmeted and bearded Neutron Knight in the bar. So it seems fair to assume the artist intended it to be a Catavolcus cameo.

   He's got a full entry on the Appendix, but I wanted to include a sub-profile here (a) to explain the reasoning for identifying him as Catavolcus; (b) to show the picture so they readers can make their own minds up; and (c) to give him a separate entry just in case those reading prefer to consider him a generic Neutron Knight. 

 

--Doctor Who Monthly#66  (Doctor Who Magazine#173


Catweazle

Fleeing Norman soldiers, 11th century Saxon wizard Catweazle attempted to evade them via magic, and accidentally transported himself to 1969 A.D. Befriending some local children, he found his new world confusing, viewing all advanced technology as some kind of magic, and constantly sought to find a spell to return him to his own era.

    Perhaps as a result of one of his attempts to return home, Catweazle ended up on Maruthea and attended Bonjaxx's party; perhaps sensing trouble brewing, he left moments before the brawl broke out.

Comments: Created by Richard Carpenter, Catweazle debuted in his eponymous television series on 15th February 1970. The show ran for two seasons.

    Catweazle was played by Geoffrey Bayldon, who had been one of the first actors to be offered the role of the Doctor when that series was in production. Though he turned it down at the time, Bayldon went on to guest star in one of Tom Baker's stories, and eventually played an alternate reality first Doctor in a couple of Big Finish audio plays.

    Catweazle had his own comic strip annuals from 1970, and an ongoing comic strip began in British anthology title Look-In, which specialized in strips based on television properties, beginning with Look-In II#2 (8th January 1972).

   He's in two panels, but obscured by word balloons in one and half off the panel in the other; the giveaway to his identity is the distinctive moustache and the bindle he carries.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Cheetah Person

 

The Cheetah People were a species of feline humanoids from a planet known only as the Cheetah World. At least some, possibly even all, Cheetah People were not natives to the planet; Cheetah People could teleport at minimum interstellar distances across space and possibly even time, capturing other humanoids and transporting them back to the Cheetah World for prolonged hunts.

    Some victims were caught and eaten, but those who lasted long enough could succumb to the artron energy in the magnetosphere and gained the symbiotic relationship that the Cheetah People shared with their sentient planet, gradually transforming into new Cheetah People.

   One of the Cheetah People made it as far as Maruthea, where they fought against Captain U.K. during the barroom brawl at Bonjaxx's.

Comments: Created by Rona Munro.

   The Cheetah People debuted in the Doctor Who television story Survival on 22nd December 1989.

    This marks their only appearance in Marvel titles, at least as far as I am aware.   

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


The Chief

The Chief was the cyborg leader of a tribe of cannibals living in a derelict city on a heavily polluted Earth-like world, where the survivors had to remain in the self-contained subway system to be able to breathe.

    The Chief led his followers in preying on these other survivors, clashing with (and eating) the Guardian Angels, vegetarians who sought a way out of the city in the hope that there might be a better life with more breathable air in the now-mythical countryside.

    When the Doctor arrived in the city, he was rescued from a cannibal attack by the Guardian Angels and sought to help them take control over the automated subway trains so they could escape the city. However, the Chief, angered by the Angels' continued disruption of his gang's hunting, launched a full scale assault on Guardian Angel HQ, slaughtering his way through the guards. The four remaining Guardian Angels fled on to their commandeered train before the cannibals could reach them, with the Doctor voluntarily remaining behind to finish adjustments in the control room. Just as he finished, the Chief reached the control room, using his chainsaw arm to slice his way through the door. The Doctor hastily flipped a switch to send the train on its way, then dodged the Chief's lunge, and the cannibal leader struck a power cable and fried himself. With the other cannibals distracted by the prospect of a freshly cooked meal, the Doctor made his escape back to his TARDIS.

   Despite his apparent demise, the Chief later turned up on Maruthea; whether this was prior to his death thanks to time travel, an alternate reality version, or he had somehow survived being electrocuted and partially devoured by his followers, remains unrevealed.

    During the barroom brawl, he was punched flying by a Captain Britain counterpart.

Comments: Created by Steve Parkhouse and Dave Gibbons.

--Doctor Who Monthly#54  (Doctor Who Monthly#55, Doctor Who Magazine#173


Chumbley

 

The Chumblies were robotic servants of the Rills, a race of reptilian telepaths. Since the Rills could not metabolize oxygen, the Chumblies served as their probes on many worlds, as well as translators when their masters wished to communicate with non-telepathic species. Despite the Rills declaring themselves pacifists, the Chumblies were armed with flame-throwers, projectile weapons and bombs, as the Rills were willing to use force if attacked first. The Rill name for their robots is unrevealed; Chumbley was a nickname given to them by the Doctor's companion Vicki Pallister, based on the sound they made when moving, and was a moniker the Rills seemed happy to subsequently adopt.  

 

   A Chumbley was present in Bonjaxx's Bar on Maruthea during the birthday part brawl, hovering around Emma Peel's leg.  

 Comments: Created by William Emms.

   The Chumblies debuted in the Doctor Who television story Galaxy 4 on 11th September 1965. This is their only appearance in a Marvel comic.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Conan

A version of Conan attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea, wearing a "Crom Rules" party hat, a red clown's nose, and a look of annoyance, probably at being forced to wear the undignified apparel.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Conan, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

    The case might be made that there's no way 616 Conan would wear such silly party gear, but that's true of virtually any incarnation of barbarian Conan.  

--Incomplete Death's Head#11


Corps members

At least five different Corps members attended Bonjaxx's party on Maruthea.

    A male and female wearing outfits similar to Captain Britain's original costume and Captain U.K.s original outfit were at the window looking out and perhaps holding hands when the seventh Doctor arrived.

    A second Corpsman wearing a costume matching the one first given to Captain Britain by Merlyn as he returned home from Otherworld after helping revive King Arthur was visible during the brawl, fighting the cyborg cannibal Chief.

    Another wearing a version of Captain Marshal's costume (later adopted by Captain Britain-616) was about to pound John Steed when Emma Peel intervened; this Corpsman later offered to help the two Death's Heads fight Hob.

    Finally, Captain U.K. was present, wearing the costume Mastermind had modified for her, and was seen fighting a Cheetah Person.

Comments: Given that the Corps members regularly travel between realities, it's hardly a surprise to find a number of them on Maruthea. Their actual identities are harder to pin down. In theory any of the men could be Captain Britain-616, and any of the women Captain U.K.-238, but unless there are multiple versions of the same person around from different points in their timeline (not impossible - that's exactly the case for both the Doctor and Death's Head), they can't all be CB-616 and CUK-238. However, given the other cameos by the artist were presumably meant to be the "real" versions, I'm willing to assume that the versions wearing the then-current costumes were indeed 616 and 238; to whit, the guy fighting Steed and later offering to help fight Hob is 616 CB, and the woman tackling the Cheetah Person is 238 CUK.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173 (Incomplete Death's Head#12 


Crazy Gang

A version of the Crazy Gang's Jester and Knave attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if these are the 616 Jester and Knave, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" ones.

    It's probably not the 238 incarnations, Coco and Jack of Hearts, since they should have been destroyed when their reality was. No other members of their team were seen, but they could have been present off-panel.

--Incomplete Death's Head#11


Cusick, Doot and the talking fish

Native Americans Cusick the Tuscadora and his student Doot of the Wawenoc were Timespirits, shamans able to travel through time and between realities, gathering souls to transport safely to the afterlife.

    They and their occasional nemesis, the talking fish, visited Bonjaxx's Bar on Maruthea during one of these journeys.

Comments: Created by Stephen Perry and Tom Yeates.

    Cusick and Doot were the stars of Epic Comics Timespirits.

   Given the nature of their powers, I think it's fair to assume that these are the "genuine" Cusick, Doot and talking fish, rather than alternate reality versions.

    Given the events of the final story of the Timespirits series (which I won't spoil here beyond whatever clues this comment provides) their visit to Maruthea probably happens some time prior to Timespirits#7.

--Timespirits#1  (Timespirits#2-8, Doctor Who Magazine#173


Cyber-Controller

Cyber-Controllers were leaders amongst the Cybermen, humanoids who had replaced most of their organic bodies with cybernetic technology.

    The Doctor encountered several over the years. The one at Bonjaxx's party resembled a Cyber-Controller the second Doctor encountered on Telos, though it probably wasn't that one, since the Telosian Cyber-Controller was sealed into the Tombs on Telos by the Doctor, and had upgraded its appearance by the time it eventually got free again. The one on Maruthea was knocked to the floor during the brawl that broke out between the customers.

Comments: Created by Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, the Cyber-Controller debuted in Doctor Who's Tomb of the Cybermen episode 2 (9th September 1967). 

--Doctor Who Magazine#173, 351-353


Cybermat

Cybermats were smaller animals and very young children turned into cybernetic tools / weapons by the Cybermen.

    The Doctor encountered several over the years. A cybermat was visible scurrying around behind Ivan Asimoff in Bonjaxx's Bar on Maruthea during Bonjaxx's birthday party.

 

Comments: Created by Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, the Cybermats debuted in Doctor Who's Tomb of the Cybermen episode 2 (9th September 1967). 

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Daleks

    Mutated survivors of the Kaled race placed into armored engines of war by their creator Davros, the Daleks were engineered to hate all other lifeforms, and set out to exterminate the entire universe. They came into conflict repeatedly with the Doctor, becoming indisputably his greatest enemies, and even engaged in a Time War with the Time Lords of Gallifrey.

   A pair of Daleks in love visited Bonjaxx's Bar on Maruthea. Since this was an emotion normally alien to Daleks, they may have been members of the rebel humanised-Dalek offshoot created when the second Doctor tricked his foes into copying his "human factor" on to a number of their species.

Comments: Created by Terry Nation and Raymond Cusick. Daleks debuted in the Doctor Who story The Mutants (later retroactively titled The Daleks, in part to avoid confusion with another story also called The Mutants) on 21st December 1963 (sucker arm only)/28th December 1963 (whole Dalek). The Daleks were so popular that they got their own ongoing comic strip, debuting in TV Century21#1 on 23rd January 1965.

   If these are a pair of humanised Daleks, that group debuted in the final episode of the story The Evil of the Daleks (1st July 1967).

--Doctor Who Weekly#1  (Doctor Who Weekly#2-4, 17-20, 27, 30-34, Abslom Daak: Dalek-Killer, Doctor Who Monthly#46, Doctor Who Magazine#104, 152-155, 173, Incomplete Death's Head#12, Doctor Who Yearbook 1993, Doctor Who Magazine#197-202, Doctor Who Magazine Summer Special 1993, Doctor Who Magazine#207, Doctor Who Magazine Spring Special 1995, Doctor Who Magazine#249-255, 312-317, 408, Gambit & Bishop#3, Amazing Fantasy II#15/4 


The Defender

 

    The Defender was a security robot working on a spaceship belonging to the Akkers, the universe's most dull species.

    When the sixth Doctor, Frobisher and Ivan Asimoff boarded the ship to force the Akkers to free a young zyglot they had captured in their gravity nets, the Defender was activated to stop them, but failed dismally.

   The Defender later ended up on Maruthea in Bonjaxx's Bar, and when the brawl broke out, it took the opportunity to get a little revenge on Asimoff.

 

Comments: Created by John Parkhouse and Steve Ridgway.

 

--Doctor Who Magazine#97  (Doctor Who Magazine#173


Defense Synths

    Hob used mechanical "defense synths" to guard his facility on Maruthea.

    When Tuck and Death's Head (Minion) were transmatted straight into the heart of the facility, three synths swiftly attacked them.

    Death's Head swiftly decapitated one with his arm in blade configuration, then Tuck blew up a second with her energy crossbow, and moments later Death's Head finished off the remaining one.

--Incomplete Death's Head#1


Destroyer

    The Destroyer, Lord of Darkness and Eater of Worlds, was a demon-like opponent encountered by the seventh Doctor, when the Destroyer was summoned by the sorceress Morgaine and then unleashed to destroy the Earth. Though immensely powerful, he could be bound using magic and was vulnerable to silver, which proved his downfall when the Doctor's ally Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart shot him repeatedly with silver bullets.

    The Destroyer later (or earlier perhaps, from the Destroyer's point of view) visited Maruthea and was in Bonjaxx's when the brawl broke out. He was swiftly taken down by a flying kick to the back of the head delivered by Death's Head (F.P.A.).

Comments: Created by Ben Aaronovitch.

    The Destroyer debuted in episode 3 of the Doctor Who story Battlefield (20th September 1989). 

   As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the "real" Destroyer, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be.

    Given he's still wearing the chain round his neck that formerly bound him, it does seem like it is intended to be the "actual" Destroyer.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


The Doctor

    The Doctor is a Gallifreyan Time Lord who visited Maruthea on multiple occasions, as evidenced both by comments he made and the numerous identically wrapped presents he gave to Bonjaxx. His sixth (or perhaps fifth) incarnation had to eject a penguin from his TARDIS before departing, while the seventh and his companion Ace ran into an unspecified later incarnation (the "nth" Doctor) and his companion Ria. Moments after both departed the fourth incarnation arrived, apparently having been aiming to visit Brighton Pavillion. The seventh returned soon after as well (though perhaps much later from his personal perspective) to wipe the memories of the Freelance Peacekeeping Agent incarnation of Death's Head of meeting his own future Minion incarnation. The nth Doctor mentioned he had attended several of Bonjaxx's birthday parties, or perhaps the same ongoing one on numerous occasions.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173, Incomplete Death's Head#11-12 ...and way too many others to list 


Doctor Doom

    A version of Doctor Doom attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Doctor Doom, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

--Incomplete Death's Head#11


Doctor Octopus

      A version of Doctor Octopus attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea, and tried to use one of his tentacles to take a drink from Doctor Strange's floating tray.

 

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Doctor Doom, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

--Incomplete Death's Head#11


Doctor Strange

    A version of Doctor Strange attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

    Despite using magic to levitate the tray carrying the round of drinks he had bought, he still had to fend off Mr. Fantastic and Doctor Octopus' extended limbs from pinching some.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Doctor Strange, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

--Incomplete Death's Head#11  (Incomplete Death's Head#12 


Ferengi

A Ferengi was in attendance at Bonjaxx's birthday party, sitting on the table adjacent to the seventh Doctor and Ace.

Comments: Created by Gene Roddenberry.

    This is unlikely to be any specific Ferengi, since they'd only appeared in seven episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation at the time this story was originally published, all featuring fairly unmemorable one-shot Ferengi; the first memorable Ferengi, Quark, was still two years away from making his debut.

   A Ferengi was originally depicted on the cover of Cosmic Ghost Rider#3 in advanced solicitations, but had been changed to a more generic alien by the time the issue saw print.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173  


Freefall Warriors

    Four mercenaries turned stunt pilots, the Freefall Warriors first encountered one another on Warworld, a planet used by Intra-Venus Inc. to demonstrate new ordinance to prospective clients. Composed on the android Cool Breeze, the cyborg Machine Head, bio-engineered shark-faced pirate Bruce and their feline leader Big Cat, the Warriors were amongst the galaxy's greatest fliers.

   They first met the fourth incarnation of the Doctor and his friend Ivan Asimoff while at the Festival of the Five Planets, working together to prevent an attack by raiders. Some time after this Big Cat faced off against his old adversary Shaman Kahn in a race against Kahn's ship Sudden Death, a challenge that ended when Big Cat tricked Kahn into flying into an asteroid.

   Apparently surviving but possibly in no shape to personally pursue vengeance again, Kahn put a price on his nemesis' head, and alerted Beep the Meep that he believed the Warriors were on Maruthea. The Warriors were enjoying a quiet drink in Bonjaxx's when the drunken Meep approached them. Bruce and Cool Breeze swiftly knocked him out, but the similarly inebriated Bonjaxx tripped while trying to jump over the bar to intervene, bumping into Abslom Daak. The other patrons took this as an excuse to start an all out barroom brawl, during which Machine Head got tossed flying by a Werelok and Bruce tangled with an Alien Guard.

Comments: Created by Steve Parkhouse and Dave Gibbons, the Freefall Warriors debuted in the fourth Doctor story The Freefall Warriors in Doctor Who Monthly#56. They returned for their own story in Doctor Who Summer Special 1982. When work began on relaunching Captain Britain in his own monthly title, the original plan was to have him share his title with reprints of Abslom Daak, Night Raven, and the non-Marvel but SF related Jeff Hawke, a newspaper strip character. However, those plans were shelved, and Hawke was replaced fairly late in the day by a brand new Freefall Warriors strip. The original cover for Captain Britain II#1, featuring Hawke, can be seen on Alan Davis' website here, alongside the revised version featuring the Freefall Warriors that actually saw print.

    I would ASSume that Bruce is named in honor of Bruce, the robotic shark used in the Jaws movies.
--Snood

--Doctor Who Monthly#56 (Doctor Who Monthly#57, Doctor Who Summer Special 1982, Captain Britain II#1-4, Doctor Who Magazine#173, Incomplete Death's Head#12 (last one Bruce only)


Giggles

A version of the Warpies' Cherubim Giggles attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea, and was close by the Freefall Warriors when the brawl broke out.

 

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Giggles, but between Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex allowing virtually anyone to get there, and Giggles having the ability to warp space to travel interdimensionally (as demonstrated in Captain Britain II#14), there's every reason to believe this could be 616 Giggles.

--Captain Britain II#7  (Captain Britain II#8-14, Doctor Who Magazine#173, Excalibur I#63-65, Excalibur II#2-4


Ghost Rider

A version of Ghost Rider attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Ghost Rider.

    Assuming it is a Ghost Rider-616, from the outfit and the year the story was published, I'd assume this was Danny Ketch.  

--Incomplete Death's Head#11


Hulk

A version of the Hulk attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea, visible at the bar as the seventh Doctor and Death's Head (F.P.A.) entered, and then seated at a table adjacent to the seventh Doctor and Ace prior to the brawl. He wasn't visible during the ensuing brawl, perhaps thankfully for all concerned; perhaps this was because "Hulk is the drunkest one there is!"

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Hulk, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173  (Incomplete Death's Head#11


Human Torch

A version of the Human Torch attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Human Torch, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

    The Fantastic Four are known for journeying to other times and realities, and most of the team were visibly present (and the one that wasn't seen was the Invisible Woman, whose name alone suggests why she wasn't spotted).

--Incomplete Death's Head#11 (Incomplete Death's Head#12, Death's Head#8 (BTS)


Halbert Jetsam

Halbert Jetsam, his partner Arrold Flotsam and their windmill-powered robot assistant Dutch, together made up Backwater Scrap And Salvage Company PLC, an interstellar scrapyard dealer, collecting space junk scooped up by their ship, Drifter. Unaware of just how dangerous their salvage was, they began repurposing deactivated Cybermen to sell as butlers to the galaxy's wealthy, but after accidentally snagging the fourth Doctor's TARDIS in one of their sweeps through space, one of the Cybermen they had found reactivated, stole the TARDIS and kidnapped Jetsam. While the Doctor, Flotsam and Dutch pursued in the Drifter, the Cyberman took Jetsam to the planet AS4, formerly a Cyberman stronghold, and forced him to work on reviving its inactive leader Zogron. Jetsam did as instructed, but the Cyberman was not impressed when Zogron then enquired as to its choice of alcoholic beverage to drink before dinner.  Luckily for Jetsam, the others arrived in time to save him. The Doctor departed, reluctantly leaving the dealers to begin salvaging the remains of the Cyberman army.

    Four months later, gunrunner Joylove McShane arrived on AS4, posing as an antiques dealer wanting to buy the remaining Cybermen. In truth he intended to reactivate and sell them on, thinking them merely soldier robots. Luckily for Flotsam and Jetsam, the Doctor returned at the same time (mostly because he'd accidentally only moved in time, not space, when he left, so for him this was minutes after leaving the first time) and put paid to McShane's schemes.

    Jetsam later ended up on Maruthea, where he got caught up in the brawl in Bonjaxx's Bar, during which he was lifted aloft by Shayde.

Comments: Created by Steve Parkhouse, Mike McMahon and Adolfo Buylla, Jetsam first appeared in the Doctor Who comic strip Junkyard Demon in Doctor Who Monthly#58 (November 1981).

    The two scrap merchants first names, Halbert and Arrold, are a nod to the characters Albert and Harold Steptoe, father and son rag-and-bone men from the classic British sitcom Steptoe and Son; American readers may be more familiar with the NBC remake, Sanford and Son.   
    Lamont, you big dummie!--Snood

--Doctor Who Monthly#58  (Doctor Who Monthly#59, Doctor Who Magazine#173, Doctor Who Yearbook 1996


K1

Created by Professor Jeremiah P. Kettlewell using a living metal, Experimental Prototype Robot K1 (a.k.a. the Giant Robot) was designed to replace humans in performing dangerous tasks, but was misused by the Scientific Reform Society, who sought to blackmail the world via the threat of nuclear annihilation into ceding power to their scientific elite. Given orders that contradicted its Prime Directive not to kill humans, it went insane, and was only stopped when the fourth Doctor destroyed it using a virus designed to target its living metal.

   Despite its apparent destruction, K1 or a robot of the same design later turned up on Maruthea, and was visible during the tail end of the barfight, looming down on Abslom Daak as the Dalek-Killer struck down a White Robot. 

Comments: Created by Terrance Dicks, K1 debuted in the Doctor Who TV story Robot on 28th December 1974.

    Since the original K1 appeared to be destroyed, the one on Maruthea is likely either an alternate reality version, or a new robot based on Kettlewell's design; audio plays and comics published by Titan Comics after the Party Animals story have confirmed the existence of subsequent robots in the sequence.
--Can't K1 just have been pulled out of existence or otherwise arrived on Maruthea before its destruction?
--Snood

--Doctor Who Magazine#173  


K-9

K-9 Mark I was built by Professor Frederick Marius in the year 5000 A.D. to serve both as a mobile computer and a companion, replacing his pet dog, Kelso, that he had been forced to leave behind on Earth when his work took him to the Bi-Al Foundation's research station in the asteroid field; Marius based the computerized dog after the design of a similar but much more ancient computer owned by his niece's fiance, Frank, which had been inherited from Frank's distant ancestor Sarah-Jane Smith. After the fourth Doctor and his companion Leela saved his life, Marius gifted K-9 to his new friends, and they traveled together until Leela and K-9 left the Doctor to stay on Gallifrey.

   The Doctor made a new K-9, Mark II, which accompanied him and his new companion, Romana, for a number of years, until they too left the TARDIS, eventually ending up on Gallifrey too, where the two K-9s enjoyed a minor rivalry. The Doctor also built another K-9, Mark III, which he left as a present for his former companion Sarah-Jane Smith, and later replaced it with K-9 Mark IV after Mark III sacrificed itself saving their lives. Sarah-Jane would eventually leave it to her descendants after she passed away...

   The Doctor apparently also made a K-9 for his friend Bonjaxx, based on the distinctive shape of one of the presents stored behind Bonjaxx's bar counter.

Comments: Created by Bob Baker and Dave Martin, K-9 debuted in the second episode of the Doctor Who TV story The Invisible Enemy on 8th October 1977.

   I'm only listing Marvel (and subsequent Panini) appearances for K-9, as if I include his appearances in other comics I'll have way too many to comfortably list.    

--Doctor Who Weekly#12  (Doctor Who Weekly#17-35, 38-42, Doctor Who Monthly#44-51, Doctor Who Magazine#173, 230-233, Doctor Who Magazine Holiday Special 1992, Doctor Who Yearbook 1993, Doctor Who Summer Special 1995, Doctor Who Magazine#390  


Kalik

The Kalik are a sentient insectoid race who were once a warrior species that feasted on their fallen enemies, but eventually their species matured, and they cast off their militaristic ways and converted to being vegetarians, making it illegal to eat anything but vegetable matter. The seventh Doctor and his friend Sarah Jane Smith encountered a rogue group who were kidnapping humans from Earth to sell as food on the black market, and put a stop to their antics.

    A Kalik later visited Bonjaxx's Bar on Maruthea during Bonjaxx's birthday party. 

Comments: Created by Andrew Donkin, Graham S. Brand and John Ridgway, the Kalik debuted in Train-Flight; seen only as a shadow and the eggs of their hatchlings in Doctor Who Magazine#159 (April 1990), they were full depicted in Doctor Who Magazine#160 (June 1990).

--Doctor Who Magazine#159 (Doctor Who Magazine#160-161, 173


Kandyman

A psychopathic robot torturer built on the human colony planet Terra Alpha by Gilbert M on the orders of the tyrant Helen A, the Kandyman's robotic frame was coated in a body composed of oversized candy. This proved unfortunate for the Kandyman when he tried to kill the seventh Doctor, because that outer shell was easily destroyed using super-heated liquids.

   The Kandyman's remains eventually made their way to the planet Tara, where he was reconstructed by Count Grendel, and ran foul of the seventh Doctor once more.

   The Kandyman later turned up in Bonjaxx's Bar on Maruthea, where he was caught up in the barroom brawl, and was just about to be struck by the Doctor's companion Ace when the Doctor called her away.

 

Comments: Created by Graeme Curry, the Kandyman debuted in the Doctor Who TV story The Happiness Patrol on 2nd November 1988.

 

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Kether Troop

Tigon Liger, Stacy Arnheim and Guillermo Perez of the Kether Troop Warheads attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea, and witnessed the two Death's Heads preparing to fight Hob.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Warheads, but given that their whole deal is to visit other realities it seems entirely reasonable to run on the assumption that it is.

   At the time Party Animals was published, Perez had died in Warheads, though he got better by the time the group returned in Revolutionary War: Warheads, having apparently escaped from Hell (literally). Whether this was his first post-Hell appearance, or the Warheads from an earlier point in their history, is impossible to say. The other surviving Warheads might also have been present. 

--Incomplete Death's Head#12


Master

Formerly known as Koschei, the Master was a renegade Time Lord and the Doctor's former best friend turned arch enemy.

    One incarnation, who had mostly battled the Doctor's third incarnation, was at Bonjaxx's party on Maruthea, and tried his best to stay out of the way of the brawl that broke out, lying on the ground to avoid flying fists and thrown furniture.

Comments: Created by Robert Holmes, the Master debuted in the Doctor Who TV story Terror of the Autons on 2nd January 1971, unless you go with various fan theories that suggest a couple of prior Time Lord villains in the show (the Time Meddler and the War Chief) were earlier incarnations yet to use the name.

    The version seen in Party Animals is the first incarnation the audience met, portrayed by Roger Delgado, but not the first incarnation of the Time Lord, as other stories have confirmed prior regenerations.

   Since the Master has appeared many times, I'm only listing the Marvel-related appearances of this incarnation of the Master, not any of the others.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173  (Doctor Who Winter Special 1991, Doctor Who Yearbook 1994, Doctor Who Magazine#311, 508-511 


Melanicus

Would-be universal conqueror Melanicus was among the many beings in Bonjaxx's Bar, pausing for refreshment during one his many journeys through time and space with his servant Catavolcus.

 

Comments: Created by Steve Parkhouse and Dave Gibbons.

   

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Melkur

The Melkur were living statues created by the evil Malador to serve as his army, but were mostly rendered dormant when he was imprisoned.

    The Master once disguised his TARDIS as a Melkur when he visited the planet Traken, where it ran into the fourth Doctor.

    The sixth Doctor later encountered real Melkurs working for Malador.

 

Comments: Created by Johnny Byrne (not the comic book writer/artist!), the Melkur first appeared in the Doctor Who television story The Keeper of Traken on 31st January 1981.

 

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Meltron

Meltron was created by the psychic Brimo the Time Witch to guard the interface between the real universe and a blank dimension she had discovered after being sucked through a black hole. In this empty dimension, Brimo found she could create matter seemingly out of nothing, unaware that her creations were draining energy from the real universe, threatening it with destruction.

    When the fourth Doctor and his companion Sharon Davies were sucked through the dimensional gateway into Brimo's dimension, they encountered Meltron, but since he was just a figment of the imagination, instead of attacking them as Brimo had intended he do to intruders, he was influenced by the Doctor's personality and offered them a cup of tea. When Brimo discovered the intruders, she instructed Meltron to kill them, but the Doctor gave a counter order to make some more tea; the resultant inner conflict literally split Meltron down the middle, and the two halves became smaller wholes that began hitting one another while shouting their conflicting commands. Brimo, Sharon and the Doctor retreated away from the fighters to continue their own battle in peace, with the Doctor soon coming out triumphant;  the TARDIS was blocking the dimensional gateway, preventing any more material being brought into Brimo's dimension, so that each use of reality manipulation in the battle destroyed another part of Brimo's realm, until she was tricked into trapping herself.

   Meltron apparently avoided being destroyed with the rest of Brimo's creations, instead ending up on Maruthea, where he took part in the birthday party brawl at Bonjaxx's bar. 

Comments: Created by Paul Neary and Steve Gibbons, Meltron debuted in the second episode of the comic strip Doctor Who story The Time Witch in Doctor Who Weekly#36 (19th June 1980) 

--Doctor Who Weekly#36  (Doctor Who Weekly#37, Doctor Who Magazine#173


Mister Fantastic

    A version of Mister Fantastic attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea, and tried to take a drink from Doctor Strange's floating tray of beverages.

Comments: Since all we see is the stretching arm, this could conceivably be any number of characters who share that ability, but since all of the new characters added by the scenes in Incomplete Death's Head are Marvel ones, and given the presence of other members of the Fantastic Four, I think it's a safe assumption that this is Mister Fantastic. 

    As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Mister Fantastic, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one. The Fantastic Four are known for journeying to other times and realities, and most of the team were visibly present (and the one that wasn't seen was the Invisible Woman, whose name alone suggests why she wasn't spotted). 

--Incomplete Death's Head#11  (Death's Head#8 (BTS)


Morbius

    Morbius was a Time Lord President who turned renegade, raising an army with which to conquer the universe. Defeated in battle on the planet Karn, Morbius was executed via disintegration, but one of his followers, the human surgeon Mehendri Solon, managed to secretly remove Morbius' brain prior to sentence being carried out; keeping it alive artificially, he began constructing a new body for Morbius out of corpses scavenged from spaceships that crashed on Karn. When the fourth Doctor arrived on Karn, Solon tried to use him to complete the creature, which lacked only a head, but instead the Doctor ensured the destruction of the patchwork monster.

    Despite his apparent destruction, Morbius managed to attend Bonjaxx's birthday party on Maruthea, where he got caught up on the fringe of the brawl that broke out. He later returned to plague the eighth Doctor. 

Comments: Created by Terrance Dicks, Morbius debuted in the Doctor Who TV story The Brain of Morbius (3rd January 1976).

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Mys-Tech

Crowe and Porlock of Mys-Tech attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea, and witnessed the seventh Doctor pulling an unconscious Death's Head (FPA) back into Bonjaxx's bar in the aftermath of the battle between the two Death's Heads versus Hob.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Mys-Tech Board, but between their ability to travel between realities and Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" ones.

--Incomplete Death's Head#12


Ogron

    Ogrons were ape-like aliens, dim and aggressive, making them useful enforcers for anyone who could intimidate them into working for them, such as the Daleks.

   An Ogron found its way to Bonjaxx's Bar on Maruthea, where it arm wrestled with Worf from the Federation starship Enterprise.

 

Comments: Created by Louis Marks, the Ogrons debuted in the Doctor Who television story Day of the Daleks on 1st January 1972.

 

--Doctor Who Weekly#13/3  (Doctor Who Weekly#14/3, Doctor Who Magazine#152-155, 173


Penguins

    A group of small penguins somehow followed the sixth Doctor around as he traveled across time and space, apparently fascinated by his companion Frobisher, a shapeshifter who often wore the form of a penguin. They first spotted Frobisher while he and the Doctor at the Ringway Carnival, then again on another alien planet where the Doctor had crash landed the TARDIS. On a beach on the tranquil planet Halcya they wandered past in their bathing suits and noted the Doctor and his companion Peri sunbathing.

    On Maruthea one tried to enter the TARDIS apparently looking for Frobisher, and was unceremoniously kicked out by the Doctor, angrily querying why it expected to find one of its friends inside his ship. The group later spotted the Doctor fishing for Gumblejacks on a riverbank somewhere in the universe while talking to himself (literally - the seventh Doctor had turned up to bother the sixth about something).

Comments: Created by artist John Ridgway, and perhaps writer Steve Parkhouse.

    The tiny penguins in the background became a subtle running sight gag across several stories illustrated by Ridgway; the ones drawn by Mike Collins in Party Animals are a touch bigger than Ridgway drew them, but are presumably the same characters, given their interaction with the Doctor.  

--Doctor Who Magazine#99  (Doctor Who Magazine#104, 123, 173, 207


Axel Pressbutton

    After having over three quarters of his body devoured by sentient Vegan Green Fungus that politely and repeatedly informed him how lovely he tasted while eating him, the formerly mild-mannered botanist Axel was driven insane. Surviving by being turned into a cyborg literally armed with a cleaver for a left hand, the psychotic Axel Pressbutton became a mercenary, working with assassin Mysta Mystralis (the "Laser Eraser").

   He met and befriended Abslom Daak when both were lying drunk on the floor of a bar on the spacestation Oasis, and some time later met up with his old friend for another drink at Bonjaxx's party on Maruthea. 

Comments: Created by Alan Moore and Steve Moore (under the aliases of Curt Vile and Pedro Henry), Axel debuted in the rock music magazine Dark Star#22 in 1979, in the strip Three Eyes McGurk and his Death Planet Commandos, which told of Axel's death at age 55; it was later reprinted in Rip Off Comix#8, which is marginally more findable if anyone reading this wants a copy. The Moores then revisited the character earlier in his life in the strip The Stars My Degradation in another music magazine, Sounds, where he was an ongoing guest character alongside the strip's actual star Dempster Dingbunger. In one of the stories, Axel helps Dempster fight the "over-written bushwacking" Ex-Men, taking on the flatulent mutant Curbcrawler and the "short, brutish and nasty" Warfarin...

   When Dez Skinn launched Warrior Magazine in 1982, he deliberately tried to capture some of the feel of Marvel U.K.'s more successful strips. V for Vendetta was intended to recapture the mystery strip feel of Night Raven; Marvelman was a superhero relaunch, similar to the one Dez had overseen for Captain Britain; fantasy series The Spiral Path echoed the appeal of Hulk Weekly's Black Knight/Otherworld saga. So when Dez asked Steve Moore for a character like Abslom Daak, Moore opted to revive Axel, setting the adventures even earlier, toning down a little of the parody, and teaming him up with "Laser Eraser" Mysta Mystralis. Daak even makes an unnamed cameo in the Pressbutton strip in Warrior#6. Pressbutton went on to be published in the USA by Eclipse, who reprinted the Warrior strips and then released new stories. When those ended, he returned for a couple of additional appearances in the anthology A1, both the first volume published by Atomeka Press and the second published by Marvel's Epic imprint.  

--Dark Star#22  (Sounds (unspecified issues), Warrior#1-12, 15-16, 21, 24-25, Axel Pressbutton#5, Laser Eraser and Pressbutton#1-6, 3-D Laser Eraser and Pressbutton, A1 I#2, Doctor Who Magazine#173, A1 II#3,


Quark

Quarks were robots that served the world-destroying Dominators, some of whom ran afoul of the second Doctor when they tried to transform the peaceful planet Dulkis into a volcanic world suitable for fueling their vessels. Another group of Dominators and their Quarks were stopped by the tenth Doctor on Earth in the 1950s, and still more were stopped by UNIT in the 1980s. Rebel Quark factions began their own campaigns of world conquering, gaining a fearsome reputation and repeatedly clashing with the second Doctor.

   One Quark made its way to Maruthea, where it wandered around Bonjaxx's birthday party prior to the brawl that eventually broke out.

Comments: Created by Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln, the Quarks first appeared in the televised Doctor Who story The Dominators on 10th August 1968. Despite making only one television appearance, the Quarks proved surprisingly popular with writers of the Doctor Who comic strip then running in TV Comic, and became recurring foes for a time of the second Doctor, ditching their television masters the Dominators to strike out on their own.

--Doctor Who Magazine#64  (Doctor Who Magazine#173


Random

A version of Random (Marshall Evan Stone III) attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Random, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

--Incomplete Death's Head#11


Rocket Raccoon

A version of Rocket Raccoon attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

 

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Rocket Raccoon, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one. 

--Incomplete Death's Head#11


Roman Empire Alien Guard

 

The Alien Guard were the protectors of the Temple of the Gods (secretly an alien spaceship) in an alternate timeline where the Roman Empire never fell and went on the conquer the stars thanks to the covert influence of the Malevilus, one of the most terrible of alien races.

    The fourth Doctor encountered them after the Empire made an incursion into his timeline which led in turn to his visiting theirs and overthrowing the Malevilus.

   One of the Alien Guard ended up on Maruthea, where he was knocked down by Bruce of the Freefall Warriors during the brawl that broke out in Bonjaxx's Bar.

 

Comments: Created by Pat Mills and Dave Gibbons, the Alien Guard appeared in part four of Doctor Who Weekly's first comic strip, Doctor Who and the Iron Legion.

--Doctor Who Weekly#4  (Doctor Who Weekly#5, Doctor Who Magazine#173


Sapphire and Steel

Sapphire and Steel were Operatives of an unrevealed authority who assigned them missions guarding the integrity of time, preventing creatures inimicable to life that dwelled within the time corridor from breaking out into normal causality and other similar disruptions. They shared little of their backgrounds with the humans they interacted with, though Steel admitted they were alien "in the extraterrestrial sense," and they hinted that their humanoid forms were assumed for their missions rather than their natural states. They sometimes worked with other Operatives, each with a different "elemental" codename (despite some codenames, including their own, not being actual elements); there were 127 Operatives in all, but twelve were "transuranic, heavy elements" who could not be used where there was life.

   At some point, whether on a mission there or during a break between missions, Sapphire and Steel visited Maruthea and attended Bonjaxx's birthday party.

Comments: Created by Peter J. Hammond, Sapphire and Steel was a television show produced by ATV (Associated Television), who held the Midlands franchise for ITV (Independent Television - e.g. not BBC) in the U.K. The series debuted on 10th July 1979, and starred Joanna Lumley (Absolutely Fabulous, New Avengers) as Sapphire and David McCallum (Man from UNCLE, NCIS) as Steel.

   The series lasted for 34 episodes spread across six stories and four seasons (series in U.K. parlance), with an Annual, plus a comic strip appearing in the British anthology title Look-In, which featured strips mostly based on television properties such as Mork and Mindy, Six Million Dollar Man, Airwolf and Battlestar Galactica. Sapphire and Steel was later revived as an audio series for a time by Big Finish, the same company who produce Doctor Who audio plays. 

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Scarlet Witch

A version of the Scarlet Witch attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Scarlet Witch, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

    She looks to have a "smiley face" button or sticker on her tiara-like headpiece...but she doesn't look like she's having a nice day...
--Snood

--Incomplete Death's Head#11


Sensorite

 

The Sensorites were a mostly benign telepathic species from a planet they dubbed the Sense Sphere. The first Doctor and his companions visited the Sense Sphere and brokered peace between them and a group of human astronauts who they had come into conflict with.

   A Sensorite later visited Maruthea, and got caught up in the brawl in Bonjaxx's Bar, getting hoisted aloft by Mercurius of the Star Tigers.

 

Comments: The Sensorites were created by Peter R. Newman and debuted in the Doctor Who television story The Sensorites on 20th June 1964. 

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Shayde

    A construct of the Matrix from the Doctor's homeworld of Gallifrey and an agent of the Time Lords sent across time to resolve situations that concerned them, Shayde assisted the Doctor on a number of occasions.

   During a rare break from duty, Shayde visited Bonjaxx's Bar to attend the Daemon's birthday party, and enjoyed a refreshing beverage while sitting nearby another pair of time agents, Sapphire and Steel. When the barroom brawl broke out, he fought the scrapyard dealer Jetsam, though what the inoffensive mechanic had done to draw his ire remains unclear.

Comments: Created by Steve Parkhouse and Dave Gibbons, Shayde debuted in the second part of the Doctor Who Monthly comic strip The Tides of Time in March 1982.

    He's got a much more detailed history as a sub-profile on the Doctor's Appendix page, but that overlooked this appearance. Oops! 

--Doctor Who Magazine#173 (many more as detailed in his actual sub-profile


Silurian

    The Silurians were the collective name given to a sentient humanoid species descended from dinosaurs, who together ruled the Earth in prehistoric times. Their dominion came to an end when they retreated en masse into underground shelters when their scientists predicted a small planetoid would pass near the Earth, its gravity temporarily stripping away much of the atmosphere and so rendering the surface uninhabitable for years. Since their hibernation units were set to wake them up only after sensors confirmed the catastrophe had come and gone, and the predicted event never actually happened, they ended up sleeping for millions of years, allowing another species, mankind, to evolve and take over in their absence.

   Eventually, in comparatively recent times, isolated shelters began waking up, and were less than pleased to find their old home overrun with filthy hairy vermin. The Doctor in various incarnations did his best to broker peace between the Earth's mammalian and saurian species, but hawkish individuals on both sides tended to mess things up, usually resulting in the destruction of whichever Silurian shelter had awoken. Hundreds of years after the 21st century, peace was finally established between humanity and the revived masses of the "Earth Reptiles" as they came to be known. 

   One Silurian, wearing a human dress and pearls, attended Bonjaxx's birthday party on Maruthea.

Comments: Created by Malcolm Hulke, the Silurians first appeared in the second episode of the Doctor Who television story Doctor Who and the Silurians (7 February 1970). They went on to a number of subsequent TV appearances, plus numerous stories in Doctor Who comics, novels and audio plays. Early issues of Doctor Who Magazine even gave them their own Doctorless spin-off story, Twilight of the Silurians.

   Back when Party Animals was published the sight of a Silurian wearing human clothing, let alone a dress (given that we couldn't distinguish Silurian genders by sight) seemed incongruous. Since then the revived TV show has introduced another, more human-looking Silurian subspecies whose genders more visibly match humanity, and one female Silurian, Madame Vastra, who routinely dresses in dresses.  

--Doctor Who Weekly#21  (Doctor Who Weekly#22, Doctor Who Magazine#173, Doctor Who Holiday Special 1992, Doctor Who Magazine#203-206, 207, 475-476, 492-493 


Silver Surfer

A version of the Silver Surfer attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Silver Surfer, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173  (Incomplete Death's Head#11


Bart Simpson

The delinquent son of Marge and Homer Simpson from the town of Springfield, tearaway child Bart Simpson somehow visited Maruthea and, despite being well below the legal drinking age in most locales, hung around in Bonjaxx's Bar. For some reason he seemed to be annoyed at Prince Salander of Draconia, and was glaring at him.

Comments: Created by Matt Groening, Bart Simpson debuted in The Simpsons short cartoons on the third episode of The Tracey Ullman Show on 19th April 1987, and has since vanished into utter obscurity, never to be seen again...

   And in case someone didn't realize the above was a joke, yes, he's gone on to star in the longest running cartoon in history and umpteen comics. The one seen on Maruthea probably isn't the 616 human Bart (yes, there is one!), since that incarnation is less cartoony looking, nor the 616 alien version (yes, there is also one), because he's got three eyes. This might be the version from the Simpsons TV show universe and/or Bongo Comics universe, but since there's no way I am going to list all those appearances, for ease I am assuming he's the version occasionally seen in other non-616 Marvel titles (but not the Skrull Bart seen in What The--?!#21.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173  (What The--?!#10, 25 


Sontaran

A race of clone warriors engaged in an eternal conflict with their shapeshifting rivals the Rutans, the Sontarans lived for war, seeing everything in terms of strategic military value. The encountered the Doctor across multiple of his incarnations, usually as adversaries, though the Doctor did become friends of sorts with one Sontaran, Strax.

   The Sontaran Brilox served as his Empire's ambassador to negotiations with the Gallifreyans (only just mastering time, and not yet truly Time Lords) and the Order of the Black Sun. When he realized that Gallifreyan delegate Rema-Du and her Black Sun counterpart Adamanth had become romantically entangled, he decided to wreck the summit, using a psy-snare to turn one of Rema-Du's Special Executive bodyguards, Millennium, into an assassin. Under his control, Millennium attacked the lead Black Sun delegate, forcing her friend and teammate Wardog to slay her, though his intervention proved too late to save her victim. Brilox assumed his actions would trigger a war between the Black Sun and Gallifreyans, but Wardog discovered the psy-snare, deduced where it had come from, and used it on Brilox, wiping his mind.  

   One Sontaran visited Maruthea and attended Bonjaxx's birthday party, even going so far as to wear a party hat, though from his expression, his heart wasn't really into it. He joined in the brawl that broke out, but was knocked down by the Doctor's companion Ace using a baseball bat, and was just starting to recover when the Doctor called to Ace that it was time to go.

Comments: Sontarans were created by Robert Holmes and debuted in the Doctor Who television story The Time Warrior on 15th December 1973. They've returned to the show many times, and appeared across every other media the Doctor has, including a number of Doctorless stories featuring them - more than would fit this site's Marvel-related remit.

--Doctor Who Weekly#8  (Doctor Who Weekly#25-26, 38, 43, Doctor Who Monthly#44-45, 57, 59, Doctor Who Magazine#173, Incomplete Death's Head#12, Doctor Who Magazine#183, 193-195, 207, 277, 365-367, 456, 475-476, 481-483


Spider-Man

A version of Spider-Man attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Spider-Man, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

 

--Incomplete Death's Head#12


Star Tigers


Daak


Salander


Harma


Mercurius

    The Star Tigers were an alliance of four individuals (friends would be the wrong word; Mercurius hated Daak, for example) who were recruited by Dalek-Killer Abslom Daak to join his quest killing Daleks.

   Daak had been a brutal career criminal finally caught and convicted for his numerous offences who chose to his punishment to be exile from Earth as a Dalek-Killer over the alternative, vaporization. DK was considered just as much a death sentence, with a life expectancy of two hours, 32 minutes and 23 seconds, but Daak opted for it because "vapourisation doesn't hurt." Transmatted to the recently invaded planet Mazam, Daak proved surprisingly proficient at eliminating Daleks, especially with his favored weapon, the chainsword, and rescued Mazam's former ruler, Princess Taiyin, just before the Daleks could execute her. As they worked together to destroy the Daleks' base on Mazam, they began to fall for one another, but just after achieving their goal Taiyin was killed by a Dalek. Escaping Mazam with Taiyin's remains cryogenically preserved, Daak swore to kill every Dalek in the galaxy.

   Piloting a commandeered spaceship, Daak made his way to Draconia, where he recruited Prince Salander and stole the Kill-Wagon his new ally had designed. Needing a crew, he recruited an old ally, the Ice Warrior Harma, and then Vol Mercurius, a former friend who he had fallen out with over a woman both had loved; despite holding a grudge (Daak had cut Mercurius' left hand off), Mercurius agreed to join too.

   The group visited Maruthea, where Daak caught up with old friend Axel Pressbutton in Bonjaxx's Bar, Salander sat stoney-faced ignoring Bart Simpson scowling at him, and Harma passed out drunk with his head on a table next to time agent Shayde. When the brawl broke out Daak threw himself into the fight, punching out Catavolcus and a White Robot, while Mercurius fought a Sensorite; the still slumbering Harma merely fell to the floor and lay there, while Salander's actions remain unrevealed.

   The Kill-Wagon was later shot down over the planet Hell by the Daleks; Daak survived, but the others were left close to death. Before the wreckage even had time to cool, the seventh Doctor chanced to arrive, and incorrectly informed by Daak that the other Star Tigers' comatose forms were dead, allied reluctantly with the violent Daak to stop the Daleks, something they achieved by Daak flying a Dalek transport platform into the Dalek ship's main reactor, blowing the place to atoms seemingly at the cost of his own life.

   However, Daak had been wrong in his hasty battlefield diagnosis of the Star Tigers' conditions; clinging to life, they were nursed back to full health via the advanced medical technology of the Helkans. Meanwhile the Daleks, seeking to find where the Doctor had taken their missing creator, Davros, devised a scheme to trick him into revealing the secret by using someone he trusted, Daak, and snatched him from time moments before his death. Though the Daleks' ruse brought the four Star Tigers back together and into the company of the seventh Doctor and his companion Bernice Summerfield, and they were forced to return Davros to the Daleks, the group managed to disrupt the Daleks' other plans and escape once more.

   Daak later split from the other Star Tigers after the Last Great Time War all but wiped the Daleks from existence. Frustrated at being unable to find Daleks to slay, he tracked down the Doctor, then in his eleventh incarnation, and after traveling with him for a while, got the Doctor to transport him back in time to fight in the Time War, to slay Daleks for the rest of his days.     

Comments: Daak and Salander created by Steve Moore and Steve Dillon, Harma and Mercurius by Steve Moore and Dave Lloyd. Daak debuted in Doctor Who Weekly#17 (6th February 1980); Salander in Doctor Who Weekly#27 (16th April 1980); Harma in Doctor Who Monthly#44 (September 1980); Mercurius in Doctor Who Monthly#45 (October 1980).

   Daak retains the singular honor of being the first, and to date only, character created for the Doctor Who comics to be confirmed in canon on the televised show. In the episode Time Heist, airing 20th September 2014, a series of files on known criminals is displayed, including one of Daak, whose file picture is taken directly from the comics.

   Their appearance in Party Animals (DWM#173) must take place prior to their seeming demise in Nemesis of the Daleks (DWM#152) rather than after the reveal of their survival in Emperor of the Daleks (DWM#198) because the Kill-Wagon, which was destroyed in Nemesis of the Daleks, is seen docked at Maruthea.

    It's fair to say that since Harma and Salander look much like every other member of their species, it's possible that it isn't them in Bonjaxx's but just generic members of their respective races. However, the presence of both Daak and the Kill-Wagon support the assumption that it is them.  

--(Daak) Doctor Who Weekly#17  (Doctor Who Weekly#18-20, 27-30, Doctor Who Monthly#44-46, Warrior#6, Doctor Who Magazine#152-155, 173, 197-202, Abslom Daak: Dalek Killer, Decalog (prose anthology, "Scarab of Death" short story), Vworp Vworp#2, Doctor Who: Free Comic Book Day 2016, Doctor Who: The Eleventh Doctor Year Two#1-10, 13-15

--(Salander) Doctor Who Weekly#27  (Doctor Who Weekly#28-30, Doctor Who Monthly#44-46, Doctor Who Magazine#152-153, 173, 198-202, Abslom Daak: Dalek Killer, Vworp Vworp#2

--(Harma) Doctor Who Monthly#44  (Doctor Who Monthly#45-46, Doctor Who Magazine#152-153, 173, 198-202, Abslom Daak: Dalek Killer, Vworp Vworp#2

--(Mercurius) Doctor Who Monthly#45  (Doctor Who Monthly#46, Doctor Who Magazine#152-153, 173, 198-202, Abslom Daak: Dalek Killer, Vworp Vworp#2


Sub-Mariner

A version of Namor attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Namor, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

   

--Incomplete Death's Head#11


Thing

A version of the Thing attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Thing, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one. The Fantastic Four are known for journeying to other times and realities, and most of the team were visibly present (and the one that wasn't seen was the Invisible Woman, whose name alone suggests why she wasn't spotted). 

--Incomplete Death's Head#11 (Death's Head#8 (BTS)


Thor

A version of Thor attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Thor, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

--Incomplete Death's Head#11


Vervoid

Vervoids were a species of artificially created sentient humanoid plants created on the planet Mogar. Bred with a survival instinct, they immediately came to view humanity as a threat to be eliminated, bringing them into conflict with the sixth Doctor. He believed he had committed genocide, albeit reluctantly, wiping them all out, but a Vervoid was present at Bonjaxx's party on Maruthea, and Abslom Daak later slaughtered twenty of them in a bar on Clundanius XI for "looking at him funny." Time Agents Captain Jack Harkness and Captain John Hart also ran foul of Vervoids when they visited Mogar in the 57th century.

   

Comments: Created by Pip and Jane Baker, the Vervoids debuted in the Doctor Who television story Terror of the Vervoids on 1st November 1986.

 

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Vesuvius

The oldest surviving robot in the interstellar Roman Empire based on an alternate Earth, Vesuvius served as a historian and was considered obsolete by those who even remembered he still existed. When the fourth Doctor traveled to Vesuvius' reality to stop the Empire from invading his own, Vesuvius helped the Time Lord overthrow the evil Malevilus who secretly ruled the Empire. In the aftermath, Vesuvius was proclaimed the new Emperor.

   He later turned up in Bonjaxx's Bar on Maruthea during the Daemon's birthday party, and desperately tried to avoid getting caught up in the brawl that broke out between the other patrons. 

Comments: Created by Pat Mills and Dave Gibbons, Vesuvius debuted in the fourth part of the Doctor Who strip The Iron Legion on 7th November 1979.

 

--Doctor Who Weekly#4  (Doctor Who Weekly#5-8, Doctor Who Magazine#173


Volstagg

A version of Volstagg (of Asgard's Warriors Three) attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Volstagg, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

--Incomplete Death's Head#11


Warlock

A version of the Technarchy's Warlock attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea.

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Warlock, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

--Incomplete Death's Head#11


Adam Warlock

A version of Adam Warlock attended Bonjaxx's birthday party at Maruthea and hung out with the Silver Surfer.

 

Comments: As with pretty much everyone on Maruthea, there's no way to be certain if this is the 616 Adam Warlock, though Maruthea's position in the center of the time-space vortex also means there's no reason why it couldn't be the "real" one.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Werelok

The Werelox were an aggressive lupine species whose fangs and claws contained venom that rewrote the DNA of those they injured to transform them into Werelox too. While working as shock troops for the Dalek invasion of the New Earth system, they were encountered by the fourth Doctor, who hypnotized one of their number, Brill, into switching sides, and used his inside knowledge to infiltrate the Daleks' battlecraft so he could modify their time drive to freeze the invaders in a single moment of time forever.

   A Werelok later attended Bonjaxx's party on Maruthea, where he joined in the brawl that broke out, joyfully tossing the Freefall Warrior Machine Head through the air.

   A Werelok politician later attended Josiah Dogbolter's 500th birthday party at Intra-Venus headquarters.

Comments: Created by John Wagner, Pat Mills and Dave Gibbons, the Werelox debuted in the Doctor Who Weekly strip The Dogs of Doom on 16th April 1980.

   Werelok singular, Werelox plural, in case anyone was wondering why the spelling keeps changing. 

   Various sites state that the Werelok in Party Animals is the Doctor's ally Brill. It might be, but Brill wore a skullcap with the number 3 on it, and the one on Maruthea wore a cap with the number 4 (as visible in the image to the right). Sure, Brill could have simply switched caps, but it does raise an element of doubt, sufficient for me not to want to positively identify the Party Animals Werelok as Brill. Which is a shame, because I really liked Brill and would be happy to see him return. Maybe the cap numbering isn't an identifier for which Werelok is which, or which unit the Werelok is assigned to; Brill wasn't the sharpest tool in the box, so maybe he's got lots of differently numbered caps and the numbering is for something else, like reminding him which day of the week it is.  

--Doctor Who Weekly#27  (Doctor Who Weekly#28-34, Doctor Who Magazine#173, 500


White Robot

The White Robots were servants of the Master of the Land of Fiction (no relation to the Time Lord known as the Master), a realm outside the normal universe that could be instantly shaped by the whims of its ruler. The second Doctor and his friends Zoe Heriot and Jamie McCrimmon accidentally entered the Land of Fiction and encountered the White Robots, but later managed to make their escape.

   The Master of the Land of Fiction may have based his White Robots on mechanical beings he knew of that existed in the real universe, as the Doctor and his two companions later ran into identical robots in the interstellar trading post known as the Frenko Bazaar.

   Whatever its origins, a White Robot was present in Bonjaxx's Bar during his birthday party, and was punched out by Abslom Daak during the fight that broke out.

Comments: Created by Peter Ling, the White Robots debuted in the televised Doctor Who story The Mind Robber on 14th September 1968. 

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Wirrn

The Wirrn were human-sized insects that usually lived in outer space, capable of traversing interstellar distances in huge swarms led by a Queen, only normally landing on planets to breed. On those occasions, the swarms would descend on a world, and the Queen would lay eggs within living host animals which would eventually be devoured when the eggs hatched into larvae, consuming not just the flesh but the knowledge and memories of their hosts, adding it to the Wirrn hivemind. The larvae would eventually transform into full grown Wirrn, but while in the larval stage could infect other organisms, slowly transforming them into larvae too.

   After the Wirrn breeding colonies in the Andromeda Galaxy were destroyed by human colonists, the Wirrn began warring with humanity and using humans as hosts. Driven from their own galaxy, they made their way to the Milky Way and eventually Earth, which had been temporarily abandoned due to solar flares. They sought to consume an Ark full of hibernating humans awaiting the chance to recolonize Earth, but were stopped by the fourth Doctor.

   One Wirrn visited Maruthea and attended Bonjaxx's birthday party. During the tail end of the brawl that broke out, the Wirrn could be seen looming behind Meltron.

Comments: Created by Robert Holmes, the Wirrn debuted in the televised Doctor Who story The Ark in Space on 25th January 1975.  

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Worf

A Klingon raised by human parents, Worf was the first of his race to join the Federation, and served with distinction for many years on both the Starship Enterprise-D and the Bajoran space station Deep Space Nine.

    During his time on the Enterprise, Worf visited Maruthea, and undertook an arm wrestling match against an Ogron in Bonjaxx's Bar.

    Worf also met the eleventh Doctor when the Cybermen attempted to merge their reality with that of the Federation, and forged an alliance with the Borg.

    Worf later encountered the X-Men when the time-traveling Enterprise was pulled off course by Kang the Conqueror into modern day Reality-616. The X-Men subsequently visited Worf's universe to help deal with a crisis involving mutants.

Comments: Created by Gene Roddenberry, Worf debuted in the first episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, Encounter at Farpoint, on 28th September 1987. He was portrayed by Michael Dorn.

    The Star Trek crossover with Doctor Who took place during the fifth season of ST:TNG, placing it before Worf's encounters with the X-Men, which took place after the second ST:TNG movie First Contact.

    Worf is also seen in Sensational She-Hulk#12, but there it's in Hollywood and on a film set so it's presumably the actor Michael Dorn rather than Worf himself.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173 (Star Trek/X-Men: Second Contact#1, Planet X novel, Star Trek: The Next Generation - Doctor Who: Assimilation2#1-8


Wrarth Warrior

The Wrarth Warriors were bio-engineered law enforcers created using body parts of the five strongest species in the Wrarth Galaxy to fight the malevolent Meeps. Though the Meeps were eventually defeated, the worst of their kind, their leader Beep, escaped and was pursued to Earth by Wrarth Warriors who finally captured him with the help of the fourth Doctor. The Wrarth became his jailors, successfully holding him for fifteen years until he was granted parole.

    When Beep subsequently made another attempt to take over Earth the sixth Doctor defeated him and contacted the Wrarth to take him back into custody.

    A Wrarth Warrior was present in Bonjaxx's Bar during the Daemon's birthday party, visibly getting into the spirit of the event by blowing on a party horn.

Comments: Created by Pat Mills and Dave Gibbons, the Wrarth Warriors debuted in the Doctor Who Weekly comic strip The Star Beast on 20th February 1980.

  

--Doctor Who Weekly#19 (Doctor Who Weekly#20-26, Doctor Who Magazine#173, Doctor Who Yearbook 1996


Yeti

When the disembodied Great Intelligence sought to begin conquering Earth in the 1930s by first establishing a foothold away from prying eyes up in the Himalayas, it used robotic servitors designed to resemble the myths of the fabled Yeti as its footsoldiers, so that even if sightings of them were reported to regional authorities they would be dismissed out of hand. Unfortunately for the Intelligence, this ploy didn't take into account the random wanderings of the Doctor, whose second incarnation stumbled across the invasion despite its remote location.

   After the Doctor stopped that incursion, one of the friends he had made in the Himalayas, Professor Edward Travers, took a Yeti robot back to London. Decades later the Intelligence reanimated it, and used it to construct more Yeti robots, which then began taking over parts of London. The second Doctor again intervened, teaming up with the army, led by Colonel Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart, and prevented this attempt too.

   In the 1980s the Intelligence managed to reanimate some more Yeti left behind in the Himalayas, but before he could do more than menace a few international travelers the robots were destroyed by the Lama Gampo with help from some real Yeti.

   A Yeti ended up on Maruthea, and was seen holding a small cocktail during the brawl that broke out at Bonjaxx's birthday party.

Comments: The Yeti were created by Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln and debuted in the televised Doctor Who story The Abominable Snowmen on 30th September 1967. 

--Doctor Who Weekly#31  (Doctor Who Weekly#32-34, Doctor Who Magazine#173, 408


Enterprise D

A Federation starship visited Maruthea; given the presence of Worf in Bonjaxx's Bar, this was presumably the Enterprise D.

    The Enterprise D crew later encountered the X-Men when their time-traveling ship was pulled off course by Kang the Conqueror into modern day Reality-616.

    The Enterprise D was also visited by the eleventh Doctor when the Cybermen attempted to merge their reality with that of the Federations', and forged an alliance with the Borg.

Comments: Created by Gene Roddenberry, the Enterprise D debuted in the first episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, Encounter at Farpoint, on 28th September 1987.

   The Enterprise D was destroyed and replaced by the Enterprise E by the time the X-Men visited the Star Trek universe.  

--Doctor Who Magazine#173 (Star Trek: The Next Generation - Doctor Who: Assimilation2#1-8


Thunderbird 3

Thunderbird 3 was one of a fleet of vehicles used by International Rescue on one version of Earth. Thunderbird 3 was the team's spacecraft, normally piloted by either of the brothers Alan or John Tracy, with a third brother, Scott, as co-pilot.

    Thunderbird 3 was among a number of vessels seen docked at Maruthea around the time of Bonjaxx's birthday party.

    The spaceship was later spotted back on Earth by the eighth Doctor's companion Anji Kapoor.

Comments: Created by Gerry and Sylvia Anderson, Thunderbird 3 debuted in the TV puppet series Thunderbirds on 30th September 1965.

   Thunderbirds also crossed over with Doctor Who via a small cameo by one of the characters, Lady Penelope, who turned up in the novel The Dying Days. I'm not aware of any other Thunderbirds references in Marvel 616 titles.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173 (Trading Futures novel


U.F.O.

When governments discovered in the 1970s that aliens have been visiting Earth to kidnap humans, a secret military agency SHADO (Supreme Headquarters Alien Defence Organisation) was set up to defend the planet. The aliens, whose identity was never discovered and who appeared humanoid (but might have been possessing human host bodies), flew hemispherical transparent-domed U.F.O.s, one of which was later seen docked at Maruthea around the time of Bonjaxx's party.

Comments: Created by Gerry and Sylvia Anderson, the titular U.F.O.s debuted in the first episode of the Anderson's first fully live-action TV series U.F.O. on 16th September 1970.

    Like most (all?) Gerry Anderson series, U.F.O. had a comic strip tie-in in the U.K. comic Countdown (later renamed TV Action); one of its neighbors in that comic was the pre-Marvel era Doctor Who strip.

--Doctor Who Magazine#173


Kill-Wagon

Developed by Prince Salander, whose family company was the biggest supplier of spaceships to Draconia, the "Imperial"-Class Frontier Defence Cruiser was intended to allow the Draconian military to defend their empire from the Daleks and other threats. Designed for deep space combat and ground attack, armed with laser cannon, ship-to-ship missiles with photon-fusion warheads and a neutrino-conversion bombing function, the prototype was intended to have a crew of six, or scratch crew of four, but could be flown by one man, ideally with a second person to handle the weaponry.

   When Salander's political rivals forced Salander and Abslom Daak to remain under house arrest on Salander's estates, Salander showed off his creation to his guest, who pronounced it a "real good looking Kill-Wagon." However, when Salander learned that the Emperor had forbidden Draconian warships to engage Dalek ships even if they were attacking unarmed civilian ships, Salander felt the Empire had abandoned its honor and helped Daak steal the Kill-Wagon. Daak recruited his old friend Harma and former friend Mercurius to complete the crew, and together they used the Kill-Wagon to destroy Daleks as the Star Tigers.

   When the Star Tigers visited Maruthea, they docked the Kill-Wagon on the station's edge.

   The Kill-Wagon was later shot down over the planet Hell, and irreparably damaged making planetfall.    

--Doctor Who Weekly#29  (Doctor Who Weekly#30, Doctor Who Monthly#44-46, Doctor Who Magazine#152-153, 173, Abslom Daak: Dalek Killer, Vworp Vworp#2


Tigerfire

The Hellcats, a trio of feline hominids from the planet Altaria, were mercenary pilots known across the galaxy. Each of the members - Big Cat, Bobcat and Wildcat - flew modified and personalized Tigerfire spaceships. After the Hellcats were betrayed by their current employer, Intra-Venus Inc., and Bobcat and Wildcat were slain, Big Cat teamed up with three other abnormal top fliers to form the Freefall Warriors. Each had their own specialized spaceship with unique abilities, with Big Cat continuing to fly Tigerfire.

   When the Freefall Warriors visited Maruthea, Tigerfire was visible docked to the side of the station.

 

--Doctor Who Monthly#56 (Doctor Who Monthly#57, Doctor Who Summer Special 1982, Captain Britain II#1-4, Doctor Who Magazine#173


Rosebud II

Incorporating technology from Doctor Doom's time machine, Reed Richards of the Fantastic Four constructed a time sled he dubbed Rosebud II, so he and his friends could investigate a time bubble Kang the Conqueror had apparently erected in the time stream. It was capable of seating six regular sized individual and one outsized one (She-Thing). The return from their mission saw the sled smashed to pieces on arrival back in their native time, but Reed suggested it could be rebuilt.

   Around the time of Bonjaxx's party on Maruthea, a rebuilt Rosebud II was parked outside the Daemon's bar, while members of the Fantastic Four drank inside.

Comments: In Fantastic Four I#337, the travelers from 616 see hundreds of identical craft being flown by individuals from alternate realities; as such, the sled's presence on Maruthea doesn't prove that it was the 616 Fantastic Four who attended the party.

 

--Fantastic Four I#337 (Fantastic Four I#338-341, Doctor Who Magazine#173


T.V.A. Time Cycle

While working for the Time Variance Authority (T.V.A.) to investigate the Time Bubble of Earth-8810, Death's Head (F.P.A.) was loaned one of their Time Cycles. He later stole it (or a similar one) for his own use, using it to take assignments that required him to time travel, and visited modern day Earth-616 and encountering the She-Hulk. 

   He later used the Time Cycle to visit Maruthea, parking it outside Bonjaxx's Bar, next to the Fantastic Four's Rosebud II.

 

--Fantastic Four I#338 (Sensational She-Hulk#24, Doctor Who Magazine#173


others

There remain a number of individuals who I couldn't identify at the party. Since everyone else matches up to known individuals, I have to assume they do too. If you recognise any of them, please do let us know.

I wondered if this was Melanicus, having donned an Australian hat between pages, but the bandolier and gun don't fit at all with his character.

This one was tiny and I had to remove stuff around it to confirm there really was a character here. It might be a Terileptil, as seen in the Doctor Who story The Visitation, though if it is the likeness isn't as good as most of the other characters - however, that might be put down to the tiny size of the image.

Another tricky one, a guy with jaggy hair and an arm up in the air. If I had to guess, I'd say Middenface McNulty (left) from 2000A.D.'s Strontium Dog strip, but I don't really feel that's who it is meant to be.

Sitting next to the Ferengi. I've seen sites claiming this is Darth Vader; while I agree that's not impossible, it would be a remarkably poor likeness compared to all the other much more recognizable cameos.

This one I feel I should know, given the distinctive outfit, but I still can't place him. 

I think this is another spaceship part hidden behind Maruthea, rather than just part of the station itself, but I haven't been able to place it thus far.

The only one from Incomplete Death's Head. Every new cameo there was a Marvel character, this must be one too, but I'm not sure who. The only one I can think of who might have the ponytail is Kitty Pryde, and I don't think it's her.

(Unknowns#1-8, spaceship)--Doctor Who Magazine#173
(Unknown#9) - Incomplete Death's Head#11


Shaman Kahn

Shaman Kahn was an ace flier who lost a race to Big Cat; unfortunately for Kahn, he also lost his career and most of his face, burned off when he crashed. He became a brutal mercenary pilot who killed without compunction and commanded a very high price to do so. On Warworld he was responsible for blowing up Wildcat of the Hellcats, and knocking Big Cat out of the sky, though Big Cat remained who their attacker had been.

   Now piloting a new ship, Sudden Death, Kahn located Big Cat and challenged him to a new race, during which Kahn maneuvered Sudden Death in front of Tigerfire, preparing to burn Big Cat with his ship's superpowered engines' exhaust. Anticipating this move, Big Cat took evasive action, and Kahn, too focussed on his adversary to watch where he was going, flew into an asteroid.

   Seemingly having survived, Kahn put a price on the Freefall Warriors' heads (see comments) and informed Beep the Meep that the Warriors could be found on Maruthea, which led to the barroom brawl that engulfed Bonjaxx's. 

Comments: Created by Steve Parkhouse and Dave Gibbons, Shaman Kahn debuted in Doctor Who Summer Special 1982. He doesn't actually appear in Party Animals but is namechecked, and may have known the Warriors were at Bonjaxx's because he too was on Maruthea. It's possible that Shaman Kahn wasn't the one who put the reward on their head; Beep states that (1) Kahn told him they would be on Maruthea, and (2) that he claimed the reward, bit that he was claiming Shaman Kahn's reward, and it is fair to say that the Warriors had other enemies who might put a price on their head. However, given that no other stories mention such a price, that Kahn did have a history of hating the Warriors (Big Cat in particular), and that Kahn's last recorded encounter with them probably left him in no condition to personally pursue his vengeance, it does seem a reasonable assumption that the contract on the Warriors was one he placed. 

--Doctor Who Summer Special 1982  (Captain Britain II#3/4, mentioned Doctor Who Magazine#173


images: (without ads)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p1 of story/p27 overall, pan1 (Maruthea main image/station)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan1 (Maruthea interior)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (interior of bar/Bonjaxx's birthday party and revellers)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p23, pan4 (Bonjaxx's Bar)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan4 (party goers)
Weetabix card giveaway (Alpha Centauri full body art)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan1 (Alpha Centauri at the party)
Incomplete Death's Head#12, p39, pan4 (Apocalypse)
Doctor Who Collected Comics (Ivan Asimoff)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Asimoff at the party)
Incomplete Death's Head#12, p33, pan3 (Bishop)
Doctor Who Magazine#211, p40, pan 1 (publicity shot of Bus Conductor)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Bus Conductor at party)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan1 (Captain America)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p3 of story/p29 overall, pan1 (Captain Scarlet)
Captain Scarlet TV series end credit still (Captain Scarlet)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p5 of story/p31 overall, pan3 (Catavolcus)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p4 of story/p30 overall, pan2 (Catweazle, carry pole view)
Catweazle production still (Catweazle)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p4 of story/p30 overall, pan1 (Catweazle, moustache view)
Survival publicity shot (Cheetah Person)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan1 (Cheetah Person at party)
Doctor Who#11, p16, pan8 (Chief)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p5 of story/p31 overall, pan1 (Chief at party)
Galaxy 4 publicity shot (Chumbley)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan5 (Chumbley at party)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan4 (Conan)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Corps couple at window)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p5 of story/p31 overall, pan1 (Corps member, 1st Alan Davis Captain Britain costume)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan1 (Captain U.K.)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan5 (Captain Britain in Captain Marshall costume)
Incomplete Death's Head#12, p34, pan5 (Captain Britain in Captain Marshall costume, color)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan1 (Crazy Gang)
Timespirits#3, p30, pan4 (Cusick and Doot full body)
Timespirits#2, p2, pan3 (talking fish)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p4 of story/p30 overall, pan1 (Cusick, Doot and talking fish at party)
Crystal of Cantus CD cover (Cyber-Controller)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan1 (Cyber-Controller at party)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p5 of story/p31 overall, pan1 (Cybermat)
Doctor Who#6, p20, pan6 (Cybermat)
Doctor Who Magazine#313, p6 of story, pan1 (Daleks)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Daleks in love)
Doctor Who Collected Comics, p35, pan6 (Defender)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p5 of story/p31 overall, pan3 (Defender at party)
Incomplete Death's Head#1, p2, pan1 (Defense synths)
Battlefield screenshot (Destroyer)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p5 of story/p31 overall, pan1 (Destroyer at party)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p1 of story/p27 overall, pan4 (sixth Doctor)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p3 of story/p29 overall, pan6 (seventh and nth Doctors)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p7 of story/p33 overall, pan11 (fourth Doctor)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan4 (Doctor Doom)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan1 (Doctor Octopus)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan1 (Doctor Strange)
Cosmic Ghost Rider#3 original cover (Ferengi)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p3 of story/p29 overall, pan1 (Ferengi at party)
Doctor Who#12, p11, pan6 (Freefall Warriors)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Freefall Warriors at party)
Captain Britain Omnibus TPB p91, pan1 (Giggles)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p4 of story/p30 overall, pan3 (Giggles at party)
Incomplete Death's Head#12, p33, pan3 (Ghost Rider)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p3 of story/p29 overall, pan1 (Hulk)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan4 (Human Torch)
Doctor Who#13, p4, pam2 (Jetsam)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p5 of story/p31 overall, pan1 (Jetsam at party)
Enemies of Doctor Who jigsaw (K1 robots)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan5 (K1 robot at party)
K-9 and Company novel cover (K-9)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan4 (K9 under wraps)
Doctor Who Magazine#160, p5 of story/p29 overall, pan1 (Kalik)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p4 of story/p30 overall, pan2 (Kalik) 
The Happiness Patrol publicity shot (Kandyman)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan1 (Kandyman at party)
Incomplete Death's Head#12, p36, pan1 (Kether Troop)
Doctor Who Yearbook 1994, p25, pan1 (Master)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p5 of story/p31 overall, pan3 (Master at party)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p3 of story/p29 overall, pan5 (Melanicus)
Doctor Who Magazine#170, p13, pan1 (Melkurs)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Melkur at party)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan5 (Meltron at party)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan1 (Mister Fantastic)
Brain of Morbius video cover (Morbius monster)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p5 of story/p31 overall, pan3 (Morbius at party)
Incomplete Death's Head#12, p39, pan4 (Mys-Tech board)
Doctor Who Classic Comics#26, p45, pan3 (Ogrons)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Ogron arm wrestling Worf)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan1 (penguins)
Warrior#10 cover (Axel Pressbutton)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Axel Pressbutton at party)
TV Comic#872/7, p8, pan6 (Quarks)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p3 of story/p29 overall, pan5 (Quark at party)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan1 (Random)
Doctor Who Summer Special 1985, p15, pan3 (Alien Guard)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan1 (Roman Empire Alien Guard at party)
Look-In IX#29 cover (Sapphire and Steel)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Sapphire and Steel at the party)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan1 (Scarlet Witch)
Doctor Who Magazine#284, p30, pan1 (Sensorites)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan1 (Sensorite at party)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Shayde)
Doctor Who#18, p26, pan6 (Silurians)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Silurian at party)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p3 of story/p29 overall, pan5 (Silver Surfer)
What The--?!#10, p17, pan4 (Bart Simpson)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Bart Simpson at party)
Doctor Who#6, p17, pan5 (Sontarans)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Sontaran at party)
Incomplete Death's Head#12, p9, pan1 (Spider-Man)
Abslom Daak: Dalek Killer graphic novel cover (Abslom Daak)
Doctor Who#9 p22, pan2 (Salander)
Doctor Who#12, p27, pan2 (Harma)
Doctor Who#11, p24, pan3 (Mercurius)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Star Tigers - Salander)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Star Tigers - Abslom Daak)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan4 (Star Tigers - Harma)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan1 (Star Tigers - Mercurius)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan1 (Sub-Mariner)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan4 (Thing)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan4 (Thor)
Torchwood: Station Zero#3, p19, pan1 (Vervoids)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p4 of story/p30 overall, pan2 (Vervoid at party)
Doctor Who Summer Special 1985, p16, pan4 (Vesuvius)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan1 (Vesuvius at party)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan4 (Volstagg)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan1 (Warlock)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p3 of story/p29 overall, pan5 (Adam Warlock)
Doctor Who Classics#6, p1, pan1 (Werelox)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Werelok at party)
The Mind Robber novel cover 1991 (White Robot)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan5 (White Robot at party)
Weetabix card giveaway (Wirrn)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan5 (Wirrn at party)
Star Trek The Next Generation/X-Men: Second Contact cover (Worf)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Worf arm wrestling Ogron)
Doctor Who Classic Comics#25, p5, pan3 (Wrarth Warrior)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p2 of story/p28 overall, pan5 (Wrarth Warrior at party)
Doctor Who and the Abominable Snowmen novel cover (Yeti)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p6 of story/p32 overall, pan1 (Yeti at party)
Assimilation2#1 cover (Enterprise D)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p1 of story/p27overall, pan1 (Enterprise at Maruthea)
Thunderbirds The Comic Collection#3 cover (Thunderbird 3)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p1 of story/p27overall, pan1 (Thunderbird 3 at Maruthea)
Bandai U.F.O. model kit cover (U.F.O.)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p1 of story/p27overall, pan1 (U.F.O. at Maruthea)
Doctor Who#10, p23, pan2 (Kill-Wagon)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p1 of story/p27overall, pan1 (Kill-Wagon at Maruthea)
Doctor Who#12, p18, pan3 (Tigerfire)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p1 of story/p27overall, pan1 (Tigerfire at Maruthea)
Fantastic Four I#337 cover (Rosebud II)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p23, pan4 (Rosebud II on Maruthea)
Fantastic Four I#338, p7, pan1 (T.V.A. Time Cycle) 
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p23, pan4 (T.V.A. Time Cycle on Maruthea) 
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p5 of story/p31 overall, pan3 (Unknown#1, wearing a hat)
The Visitation publicity still (Terileptil)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p4 of story/p30 overall, pan2 (Unknown#2, fish guy)
Best of 2000A.D. Monthly#79 cover (Middenface McNulty)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p4 of story/p30 overall, pan6 (Unknown#3, guy with arm in the air)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p3 of story/p29 overall, pan1 (Unknown#4, next to the Ferengi)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p5 of story/p31 overall, pan3 (Unknown#5, with the distinctive costume)
Doctor Who Magazine#173, p1 of story/p27overall, pan1 (unidentified spaceship)
Incomplete Death's Head#11, p24, pan 1 (Unknown#6, with ponytail)
Doctor Who#14, p10, pan7 (Shaman Kahn)


Appearances:
Doctor Who Magazine#173 (15th may 1991) - Gary Russell (writer), Mike Collins (pencils), Steve Piri (inks), John Freeman (editor)
Incomplete Death's Head#1 (January 1993) - John Freeman (plot), Dan Abnett (script), Simon Coleby (art), John Freeman (editor)
Incomplete Death's Head#2-4(February 1993-April 1993) - Dan Abnett (script), Simon Coleby (art),  John Freeman (editor )
Incomplete Death's Head#5-8 (May 1993-August 1993) - Dan Abnett (script), Simon Coleby (art), Tim Quinn (editor)
Incomplete Death's Head#9-10 (September 1993-October 1993) - Dan Abnett (script), Simon Coleby (pencils), Sean Hardy (inks), Tim Quinn (editor)
Incomplete Death's Head#11 (November 1993) - Dan Abnett (script), Simon Coleby (pencils), Niel Bushell & Tim Perkins (inks), Tim Quinn (editor)
Incomplete Death's Head#12 (December 1993) - Dan Abnett (script), Simon Coleby (pencils), Niel Bushell (inks12), Tim Quinn (editor)


First Posted: 02/13/2019
Last updated: 03/12/2019

Any Additions/Corrections? please let me know.

Non-Marvel Copyright info
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Special Thanks to www.g-mart.com for hosting the Appendix, Master List, etc.!

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