J. JONAH JAMESON
(of Earth-8107)

Real Name: J. Jonah Jameson

Identity/Class: Extradimensional/alternate reality (Earth-8107) human

Occupation: Daily Bugle owner/publisher, Jameson Network owner

Group Membership: Daily Bugle (Betty Brant, Mortimer, Peter Parker, "Robbie" Robertson, unidentified Daily Bugle pilot, others), New York Publishers Club

Affiliations: Betty Brant, Doctor Doom (briefly), Ka-Zar, Mortimer, May Parker, Peter Parker (Jameson was unaware of Parker's dual identity as Spider-Man), "Robbie" Robertson, "Wild" Willie Wilson, unidentified Bugle Pilot

Enemies: Black Cat, Doctor Doom (Victor von Doom), Gadgeteer (Joshua ?), Green Goblin (Norman Osborn), Iceman (Bobby Drake), Johan, J. Jonah Jameson robot, Kraven the Hunter, the Lizard, Mysterio, Nephilia (Dr. Bradley Shaw), Red Skull, Professor Gizmo, Spider-Man (Peter Parker), the Sub-Mariner (Namor), Triangle of Evil (Larry, Moe, Stuntman/Jack Riven), Videoman

Known Relatives: Mortimer (nephew)

Aliases: "JJ," "Old Foghorn," "Old Hatchet Face," "Skinflint Jameson"

Base of Operations: Private estate on Long Island, New York, USA

First Appearance: Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Bubble, Bubble, Oil & Trouble" (September 12, 1981)

Powers/Abilities: J. Jonah Jameson was a normal human with the average stamina/strength of a man who smoked regularly. He was a competent businessman.

Height: 5'11" (by approximation)
Weight: 181 lbs. (by approximation)
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Black with white streaks

History: (Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Capture of Captain America" (fb) - BTS) - As a youth, J. Jonah Jameson looked up to Captain America, considering him the greatest American hero since Herbert Hoover.

(Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends cartoon episode - "The Origin of the Spider-Friends" (fb) - BTS) - At some point, J. Jonah Jameson became owner and publisher of the Daily Bugle newspaper, hiring freelance photographer Peter Parker on Parker's condition that Jameson would not be allowed to know how Parker got his photos of Spider-Man.

(Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends cartoon episode - "The Origin of the Spider-Friends") - Jameson was aware of the heroic Spider-Man and already running a negative campaign against him when Peter Parker brought in some candid shots of the wall crawler. Jameson told him to peddle them somewhere else, claiming the newly-debuted mutant heroes Iceman and Firestar were now what captivated the public. He told Parker that if he could get shots of them then they could talk business.

(Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends cartoon episode - "The Origin of the Iceman" (fb)) - Jameson appeared on television calling Spider-Man a menace and promising a handsome reward from the Daily Bugle to anyone who could capture the wall-crawling hero. The mutant Iceman listened to the announcement and took the publisher's words seriously. When Iceman subsequently brought a captured Spider-Man to Jameson, the publisher revealed what the reward was: a month's free subscription to the Daily Bugle and an autographed photo of Jameson himself. He was then given a snowball and webbing to the face for his efforts.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "Bubble, Bubble, Oil & Trouble") - Jameson called May Parker's house looking for Peter Parker. After exchanging pleasantries, Jameson grew outraged when the older woman refused to put her studying nephew on the phone. Jameson informed May of the diamond exchange being robbed and how he needed Parker to cover the robbery but when told Peter's homework came first and having her hang up on him, Jameson sarcastically said "you’re so welcome." When all of the oil in the city was stolen, Jameson raged that he was unable to get any photos without Parker but when his nephew Mortimer offered to get the photos instead, Jameson called it a wonderful idea and told him to take the Bugle's helicopter. He then turned to his secretary Ms. Brant, and ordered her to get a hold of Peter, explaining that if his aunt answered, tell her it was a wrong number.

When Mortimer later returned, Jameson was ecstatic as Mortimer told him he had photos of Spider-Man being finished by Doctor Octopus. Upon finding all the photos were blank, however, Jameson coolly asked if the pictures were some kind of joke. Peter Parker then strolled in with pictures of the fight and Jameson quietly admitted Parker's pictures were pretty good. When Parker soon realized he hadn't finished his homework project and expressed concern about failing, Jameson offered him a "Can't win them all, my boy!" He then complimented Parker again on the photos, making Parker realize he could use the photos as his project. 


(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "Dr. Doom, Master of the World") - As Parker arrived at the Bugle office an hour late, Jameson's rant was cut short when Parker offered him some shots of the recently-disappeared President. Jameson refused, pointing out that the President was now old news and that other Bugle photographers had beaten him to the punch. Parker countered that the photos were of the President before his plane disappeared. Surprised, Jameson took the photos and considered them an equal exchange for Parker being late. When Mortimer suggested covering the UN for the Bugle, Jameson told his nephew to take Parker along for pictures and praised his nephew for his loyalty and obedience.



Later, after Doctor Doom failed in an assault on the UN, Jameson raged that they had no photos for the Bugle's biggest story. When Parker returned to the Bugle, Jameson called him a two-bit deserter and threatened him with a lawsuit for leaving Mortimer alone, though he calmed down as Parker pulled out photos he had taken of the UN fight between Spider-Man and Doctor Doom. 

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "Lizards, Lizards, Everywhere") - When the Lizard turned New York City into a humid jungle as part of his plan to unleash his hordes of reptiles upon mankind, Jameson was caught up in the Lizard's plan when a small army of reptiles forced their way into his office. As a boa constrictor wrapped around him, Jameson swore to print a retraction about everything he had said about Spider-Man as the hero watched from Jameson's office window. When Spider-Man asked for a full-page ad plus an article by Jameson detailing what a hero Spider-Man was, Jameson refused but before Spider-Man could leave, Jameson recanted. After Spider-Man yanked the snake off, Jameson laughed and swore that not only would he not print a retraction but he would write an article telling the public what a criminal Spider-Man was. The wall crawler then left, leaving Jameson alone in the office (see comments).


(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "Curiosity Killed the Spider-Man") - Hosting a New Year's Party at the Bugle offices, Jameson was unaware of the Black Cat making her way through the crowd and robbing them. When Spider-Man caught the thief and webbed her up, Jameson protested, thinking she was a guest. Spider-Man then handed the stolen items back to Jameson and swung off with the apprehended Cat but Jameson still refused to believe the hero's explanation. 

The next day, Jameson yelled at the arriving Peter Parker, demanding to know why he skipped the party, unaware that Parker had been there as Spider-Man. He groused that Parker missed any photos of Spider-Man and the Black Cat but when the Black Cat entered the offices via the window, Jameson sputtered in fear until the cat burglar explained her reasons for being there. After hearing that she intended to humiliate Spider-Man by stealing the Maltese Mouse, Jameson relaxed and agreed to publish her challenge on the front page of the Bugle. Jameson then ordered Parker to cover the arrival of the statue. Soon after, the Black Cat called Jameson and told him to be at the taping of the next Johnny Griffon Show.

Later, at the taping of The Johnny Griffon Show, Jameson sat next to Parker and Betty Brant as they waited for the show to start. Ignoring Parker ducking out, Jameson and the audience saw Spider-Man swing down to the stage to answer when the Black Cat challenged him. Jameson was then webbed up and hauled out of his seat by the hero, much to the delight of the audience. When he threatened to sue, Jameson was dropped unceremoniously back into his seat. During the subsequent fight between Spider-Man and Black Cat, Spider-Man was thrown back into Parker's seat via a well-placed giant mousetrap prop and Jameson laughed at the wall-crawler's predicament, saying it served him right. After the Black Cat was caught and the Maltese Mouse returned, Jameson stood backstage with Betty Brant and when Peter Parker showed up, Jameson was shocked when Betty dumped Parker and asked him out for a night on the town instead. Jameson happily agreed and told a stunned Parker not to work too hard.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Sandman is Coming") - Jameson entered the subway, complaining that the city didn't have enough taxis. Hearing a cry for help, Jameson approached the platform and saw Spider-Man tied to the tracks, unaware the hero had been tied there by the Sandman. Jameson was convinced it was a plot by Spider-Man and rushed off to get a camera. Seeing a tourist snapping pictures of a train, Jameson yanked the camera from her hands and rushed back to the bound hero. Despite Spider-Man's insistence that he wasn't doing a stunt, Jameson readied the shot and clicked away as Spider-Man freed himself. With Spider-Man now free, he chatted with the gloating publisher as the tourist arrived with her husband and a policeman. Jameson was placed under arrest and swore to take the matter up with "his dear friend," the chief of police, as he was led off in handcuffs.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Pied Piper of New York Town") - Jameson paced back and forth in his office, grumbly asking how he could be expected to put out a newspaper with the lack of crimes that day. Opening a window, Jameson nearly fell out but managed to pull himself back inside, blaming his employees during the tumble. With the window now open, Jameson heard the criminal Mysterio's music being broadcast from the street and soon fell under the criminal's hypnotic spell. Once hypnotized, Jameson climbed out onto the ledge and walked around the edge of the Bugle building. Dragged back inside by Spider-Man, Jameson was dumped back in his chair and the window webbed shut. Away from the speakers, Jameson regained his mind. Again complaining about the lack of crime and the stuffiness of the office, Jameson tried to re-open the window. Failing, he wondered "what numbskull was responsible for this?," unaware that Spider-Man was perched on the wall outside.

Some time later, Jameson was in his office when he received a phone call regarding a bank robbery, a mob and Spider-Man. Jameson swore to cover the story himself. Heading into the street, Jameson fell under Mysterio's sway as the crook's van passed by. Hypnotized again, Jameson followed the mob through the streets until they reached a missile base. Using Jameson as a pawn, Mysterio had the hypnotized publisher go through the crowd and talk to the base commander, bringing the man under Mysterio's thrall as well. Together, they made their way to the missile silo.

After Mysterio's spell was ultimately broken, Jameson woke up from his trance. He was confused but, as he spotted Spider-Man on a base monitor, he blamed the whole incident on the hero. Later, during the production of a play Peter Parker had a small part in, Jameson was outraged that he drove all the way into the city in the rain just to listen to a soaking wet Parker deliver one line. He rolled his eyes as May Parker praised her nephew.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Doctor Prescribes Doom") - Jameson was in his office arguing with "Robbie" Robertson while his nephew Mortimer stood off to the side. Jameson took the stance that the world needed more leaders like Doctor Doom in order to stop terrorism then yelled for Peter Parker when the photographer walked near his door. Jameson subsequently accompanied Parker to the United Nations to heard Doom speak and ordered Parker to get plenty of photos, musing to himself that Doom would no doubt want to meet him personally. In his hurry, Jameson tipped the cab driver a whole dime. When the driver sarcastically thanked him, Jameson groused that he meant to give him a nickel. Along with Parker and Betty Brant, Jameson entered the UN Building and was led to the balcony seating. He thought the UN was a pretty good idea, save for all the foreigners. As Doom's speech began, a page told Jameson that Doom wanted to meet with him and led him to a room. Once inside the room, Jameson was quickly kidnapped and replaced with a Doom-built robot. While the robot attempted to replace Jameson, the real Jameson, along with other people Doom had replaced, were held hostage on a Latverian boat in the harbor. Jameson grumbled that Spider-Man must have been behind everything. When the wall-crawler broke into the boat, Jameson loudly declared Spider-Man's supposed guilt but Jameson and the others were left on the boat when Spider-Man swung off to the confront Doom at the UN.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "Carnival of Crime") - Jameson received word that the Federal Reserve was getting a massive shipment of gold and ordered his nephew to cover the gold's arrival for the Bugle. He warned Mortimer not to take any unnecessary chances, as he was convinced Spider-Man was behind the latest crime wave plaguing the city. When Mortimer turned in his story, unaware that he had been hypnotized by the Ringmaster as the gold was stolen, Jameson received word that the story was false since Spider-Man didn't commit the gold robbery. Jameson bellowed at his nephew.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "Revenge of the Green Goblin") - Jameson was sitting at his desk when Betty Brant brought in the latest edition of the Daily Bugle when the paper suddenly exploded into dust. Going to the window, Jameson stared down in horror as all the Bugle papers were turning into green dust. After being told people wanted their money refunded, Jameson declared that to be the last straw and when the Green Goblin flew by his office window and claimed responsibility, Jameson threw himself at the Goblin. He fell short and dropped several stories but managed to grab a window ledge, saving himself and nonetheless still screaming for help. As the Goblin further taunted him, Jameson declared that he never lost before he lost his grip and fell. Only the timely intervention of Spider-Man saved the publisher from plummeting to his death. The Goblin then flew closer to the duo, offering Jameson a new story. Jameson refused until the Green Goblin told him the subject: the true name of Spider-Man. Spider-Man swung Jameson away from the Goblin, dropping him into a pile of trash, and every time the Goblin tried to shout Spider-Man's real name to Jameson, Spider-Man caused a commotion. Jameson screamed at the Goblin to repeat what he was saying but he missed hearing the Goblin every time. When the Goblin crashed into a gas tanker and reverted back to Norman Osborn, thus losing the knowledge that Spider-Man was Peter Parker, Jameson yelled at the perceived injustice until he lost his voice.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "Triangle of Evil") - Jameson, broadcasting from his private estate on Long Island, interrupted a local newscast to revel that he had received a threatening letter from the Triangle of Evil in which the group threatened to steal two valuable artifacts. Jameson raged over the audacity of the criminals. As the Stuntman and Spider-Man had a final challenge, a race across a bridge, Jameson was in the stands and when Spider-Man won, albeit tarred and feathered, Jameson laughed and wished for a photo of the spectacle, noting he'd pay anything for a reminder of the image.

Later, when Peter Parker was turning in the photos of the competition, Jameson remarked they weren't bad but weren't good either. He offered Parker his usual rate but when presented with a photo of the humiliated Spider-Man after remarking he'd pay ten to twenty times the usual amount, Jameson declared the photo front page material. The next edition of the Daily Bugle had the headline "Spider-Man, Chickenman?"

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The A-B-C's of D-O-O-M") - Jameson stood over a teletype machine and read off the latest news that Doctor Doom was inviting various world leaders to the nation of Latveria to demonstrate his latest invention. Two days later, Jameson was carving a giant apple on his desk when "Robbie" Robertson broke the news that Doom's invention was hoax. The apple split into two hollow parts, much to Jameson's annoyance.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Sidewinder Strikes") - Jameson was entertaining Wild Willie Wilson in his office as Wilson showed off his golden spurs. Jameson ordered Parker to get his photos down to the developing desk in order to make the deadline for the next edition. Wilson explained that the spurs were being taken to Madison Square Garden but by private courier instead of an armored car. When Peter Parker suggested that the nature of the transport would be a good human interest story, Jameson agreed and claimed he had thought the same thing the previous day. He groused to Wilson that good help was hard to find and reminded Wilson of their noon lunch date at Jameson's club. During lunch, after Spider-Man snuck in dressed as a waiter and presented Wilson with his stolen spurs, which had been secretly stolen by Wilson himself in his criminal guise of the Sidewinder, prompting Jameson to accuse Spider-Man of orchestrating the whole thing just to slip inside his exclusive club.

Later, during a rodeo, Jameson sat with Wilson in his private box as the show went on. When Wilson decided to continue the show despite his guest star Spider-Man missing, Jameson remarked that he could really enjoy himself. He was still in the box when the daughter of Wilson's former partner was tossed into the arena with a robotic bull. After the criminal Sidewinder was exposed as Wilson himself and Spider-Man hailed a hero, Jameson made a point to go down to the arena floor and inform the wall-crawler that he wasn't eligible for the prize money, Spider-Man having rode Diablo the robot bull for the full length of time. Jameson reminded Spider-Man that he had never signed an entry form. Back at his club, Jameson entered the dining room and brushed off the maitre's remarks on his latest editorial. When informed that Spider-Man would be working with the club for the next two weeks to pay back his debt incurred after having broken several dishes in returning Wilson's spurs, Jameson declared that he lost his appetite and stormed out of the club. 

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Hunter & the Hunted" (fb) - BTS) - Jameson got in contact with Kraven the Hunter and constructed for him a perfectly simulated jungle lair somewhere in New York State.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Hunter & the Hunted") - At some point, Jameson had the idea to have a new mascot for the Daily Bugle and settled on Zabu, the saber-toothed tiger belonging to Ka-Zar. He hired Kraven the Hunter to bring the beast back to New York and when he told "Robbie" Robertson and Betty Brant of his plan, they pointed out the flaws. Even Spider-Man chimed in, prompting Jameson to slam his window shut. When Kraven arrived in New York, Jameson cut him a check but, as Jameson was admiring his new prize, Zabu's cage broke, prompting Zabu to escape. Jameson ordered Kraven to recapture the beast and when Spider-Man stepped in to web up the animal, Jameson carefully approached Zabu but ran away when snarled at. Ka-Zar soon arrived in New York, making his way to Jameson's office, and shook Zabu's whereabouts out of him. Talking to Kraven on the phone, Jameson grew interested in pitting Kraven against Ka-Zar. Taking Mortimer with him, Jameson drove Ka-Zar to Kraven's lair despite Mortimer's protests. When they went into the lair, Kraven made it clear he wasn't letting anyone escape. Jameson called Kraven a sicko when the hunter revealed he was going to hunt Ka-Zar and that he wanted an audience to witness the hunt. Jameson and Mortimer tried to flee when Spider-Man showed up but Kraven dropped a steel door over the exit, trapping Spider-Man. Turning and running back the way they came, Jameson and Mortimer were unaware of the trap door that Kraven had opened, forcing Spider-Man to save them both by covering the opening with webbing. Jameson demanded that either Spider-Man or Ka-Zar rescue him. Upon Kraven's defeat, Jameson later saw Ka-Zar loaded onto a plane back to the Savage Land.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Incredible Shrinking Spider-Man") - Jameson, Betty Brant and Peter Parker were at a scientific convention. Jameson ordered Parker to take photos of the exhibit and what Dr. Norton had promised the crowd. Jameson was in the crowd when Dr. Norton opened a cage and let a wild lion out. When Dr. Norton shrunk the lion down, Jameson rushed over and congratulated the scientist before ordering Parker to rush the photos over to the Daily Bugle. When the Gadgeteer arrived on the scene to steal the shrinking ray, Jameson told him he couldn't get away with the theft before calling for the guards. Jameson subsequently answered Betty Brant's cries about Parker's whereabouts with the remark that Parker was no doubt the first person to flee.

Later, Jameson was in his office when a disgruntled businessman barged in and yelled about Jameson's refusal to carry ads for the man's products, a series of Spider-Man action figures. Jameson made it clear that the Bugle would never under any circumstances promote anything with Spider-Man's likeness. When the real Spider-Man (at the time having been shrunk) climbed into the desk, Jameson ignored him as the other toys were walking around and off his desk. After the real Spider-Man shot his cigar with a webline, Jameson tossed the still lit cigar into his trashcan. Seeing the businessman out the door, Jameson failed to see the cigar causing a fire or Spider-Man turning on the smoke alarm. Unaware that Spider-Man had moved into the trash can, Jameson tried to stomp the fire out until Betty Brant rushed in and dumped water into the can.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Unfathomable Professor Gizmo") - Jameson was hosting a charity event on his private yacht with several Bugle employees acting as help. He reminded Peter Parker of this by yanking his camera away and ordering him to help collect for the event. When the Monitor ship appeared and shot his yacht's radio tower off, Jameson at first refused to believe it but when orders came from the Monitor that they would sink Jonah's Whale, he changed his mind. After seeing the charity proceeds dumped overboard and stolen, Jameson demanded Parker take some pictures but grumbled when the photographer reminded Jameson that he had taken Parker's camera away.

Later, after the Spirit of St. Louis was stolen from the Smithsonian, Jameson complimented Parker on the photo but wondered how Spider-Man could have been involved in the charity theft and the Smithsonian incident. He vowed to run Parker's picture everyday until he got an answer but when answers failed to appear, Jameson argued with "Robbie" Robertson and Parker over the apparent lack of results. When Robertson pointed out Professor Gizmo's blimp. Jameson noted the message from Gizmo to Spider-Man and decided to appear at the time the Professor noted in the message. During a subsequent parade, Jameson wondered where Parker was and when Spider-Man arrived and everyone noticed the giant Spider-Man balloon, Jameson was very annoyed.

Following Spider-Man in a helicopter alongside "Robbie" Robertson and a Daily Bugle pilot, Jameson broadcasted Spider-Man's actions as he was forced to help Professor Gizmo salvage sunken gold. When the Professor was dragged off by a shark, Jameson had to be persuaded to rescue Spider-Man, telling the live audience that he was risking his own life to save the poor criminal wretch down in the water. When Spider-Man climbed up into the helicopter, Jameson balked at shaking the hero's hand. Subsequently back at his Daily Bugle office, Jameson raged at the idea of ever helping Spider-Man ever again.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "Cannon of Doom" (fb) - BTS) - Doctor Doom approached J. Jonah Jameson about drilling beneath Jameson's private property to potentially mine heat from the Earth's core and sell it to the city. Agreeing to work with Doom, Jameson argued and called for the return of Doctor Doom to New York based on what he heard about Doom's latest invention.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "Cannon of Doom") - Jameson argued with a bureaucrat about the arrival of Doctor Doom, claiming Doom's plan to tap and sell the underground heat of the Earth was free enterprise and the government had no business telling him who he could or couldn't invite to his private estate. Ignoring the man's warning about Doom being dangerous, Jameson later personally saw Doom's plane landing at the airport. At his private estate, Jameson impatiently waited as Doom put the finishing touches on his latest invention, a massive laser cannon capable of melting through the Earth's crust to the core. Doom reminded Jameson that he could control and sell the heat of the Earth's core to the city.

Jameson was soon threatened by Doom for the insult of not referring to him as Doctor Doom, a threat Jameson ignored, telling Doom he understood as he hated being called "JJ." Peter Parker then arrived at the estate, telling the two he was ordered there to take photos, and Jameson begrudgingly let Parker stay but yelled at him to get busy. Jameson then stood by as Doom activated the laser. When Spider-Man appeared, Jameson shouted out to Doom, who in turn blasted at the hero, prompting Jameson to note the burnt plot of dirt that used to be his roses. When the laser caused earthquakes, Jameson watched in horror as his windows exploded and stood slack jawed as Doom explained that he was about to unleash an earthquake on New York City. He whined that his house was in danger but when Doom ordered him to get the President of the United States on the phone, the preoccupied Jameson asked if the President fixed houses. When the cannon was finally destroyed by Spider-Man directly the cannon's laser into its control unit, Jameson was more concerned that his house was destroyed alongside it and angrily blamed Spider-Man for the damage.

Later, as his house was being repaired, Jameson invited himself to stay in May Parker's house. Sleeping in the old woman's bed as May was visiting relatives in Florida, Jameson angrily told Parker never to mention Spider-Man around him. He then whined that his double hot chocolate didn't have any tiny marshmallows.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Capture of Captain America") - Jameson put up billboards around the city celebrating the heroic Captain America. He had also arranged with the city to have a "Captain America Day" with celebrations across town. Jameson ordered "Robbie" Robertson, Betty Brant and Peter Parker into a private screening room inside the Bugle building, where he showed them a newsreel of Captain America and gave them all little American flags. Jameson gushed about Captain America, calling him "the greatest American since Herbert Hoover!"

Later in the park, Jameson ordered Parker to get plenty of pictures of Captain America and himself. After leaving Captain America, Jameson was knocked out with gas by the Red Skull, who took Jameson's place. At some point, Jameson regained consciousness and learned of Captain America's abduction. Blaming Spider-Man, he wasted no time printing editorials and going on television denouncing Spider-Man as a turncoat, sellout and "the worse traitor since Benedict Arnold." When Captain America was found, a parade was held and Jameson stood in the crowd saluting the war hero and telling him to "keep 'em flying."

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Doom Report") - When Jameson met with Latverian refuge Johan, Jameson declared Doom was one of the great world leaders and threatened the young rebel with arrest before throwing him out. After Johan's story was published in almost every newspaper save for the Bugle, Jameson raged at the news and called it a pack of lies, threatening to fire photographer Peter Parker when Parker rushed out of the office after talking to Johan.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Web of Nephilia" (fb) - BTS) - Jameson bought a blood donation button off a kid for a promised payment of three dollars and left without paying.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Web of Nephilia") - Jameson, on a paid television advertisement, declared Spider-Man a menace, citing his habit of wearing a mask and crawling on walls. Later, Jameson refused to pay Peter Parker for his latest photo unless Parker came back with a donation button.

Noticing the mutate Nephilia, Jameson was yanked from his office on the mutated man-spider's webline. Imparting Nephilia's parting challenge to Spider-Man, Jameson still complained when Spider-Man saved him and yanked the webbing from Jameson's shirt, tearing the shirt in the process. When Peter Parker later rushed inside his office, Jameson threw him out, as he lacked a donation button. Complaining about the youth of today, Jameson was yanked out of his office a second time by Nephilia's webbing and again forced to deliver a challenge to Spider-Man. Handing it off to Spider-Man, Jameson was left hanging on the side of the building as Spider-Man swung away. Shortly back in his office, Jameson started to refuse payment to Parker again due to his lack of button until he noticed the boy he bought his off of earlier standing in the office. He quickly paid both the boy and Parker, mentioning there was no need for either of them to mention the two incidents involving Nephilia to anyone.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "The Vulture Has Landed") - After the criminal Vulture began kidnapping scientists in an effort to create invisible paint for use in stealing moon rocks, Jameson talked to the police commissioner regarding the latest scientist abduction. Jameson then turned to Peter Parker and Betty Brant and blamed Spider-Man for the crimes, swearing he would expose the hero as a menace. He ordered Brant to get someone to cover the story but when Peter Parker offered, citing his scientific background, Jameson turned him down and ordered him to interview Harry Osborn, as the millionaire researcher would surely have a better quote.

Jameson soon raged when he didn’t see Parker, swearing to fire the numbskull photographer, and when Parker appeared, Jameson ordered him to accompany him and "Robbie" Robertson to catch the landing of the Jupiter Probe. On the ship where they were to witness the Probe's landing, Jameson ordered a search party for the apparently missing Parker, whom they were unaware had changed into his Spider-Man costume to battle Vulture. When Parker returned, Jameson cursed and ordered him to follow them to the bridge, as the Probe was landing. Jameson was the first to spot the Probe as its parachute opened over the water and was also the first to notice the Probe seemingly vanishing, unaware it had actually been sprayed with invisible paint by the Vulture's vultures. Speaking with "Robbie" Robertson, James was trying to figure out how the Probe disappeared when his torso turned invisible due to spilled invisible paint. Jameson was so shocked that he stumbled and fell over the side. The water washed the paint off but the publisher was still in the water, angrily shaking his fist as he sank under the water.

(Spider-Man cartoon episode - "Wrath of the Sub-Mariner") - Jameson sat in his office with a newly-purchased box of cigars. He was prepared to smoke a fresh one when the Sub-Mariner burst into his office. Commenting on the Sub-Mariner's attire, Jameson remarked that the YMCA was down the block, which prompted the Atlantian to yank the publisher up with one hand and fly out the window with him. Flying over the countryside, Jameson was forced to view the effects of pollution on nature and was then left hanging on a nearby flagpole as the Sub-Mariner left to save Spider-Man, who had been chains and tossed overboard a ship by gangsters. Jameson stayed up there until nightfall until Spider-Man happened by. Jameson sneezed as he talked to Spider-Man, prompting his coat to rip, which sent him plummeting to the street before Spider-Man snagged him with his webbing. Spider-Man then took Jameson in a web harness to a local hospital, where the publisher angrily demanded a doctor and a pair of wire cutters from the confused nurses as he was lowered to the front door.

(Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends cartoon episode - "The Origin of the Iceman") - Jameson was in a television studio preparing for another editorial against costumed heroes when Videoman appeared behind him. Jameson panicked before being blasted by the video creature and transported to a discarded Videoman arcade machine. He wandered in the game's maze, unaware that the machine was about to be crushed by the junkyard's crane. He was soon located by the heroic Iceman, who was searching for Videoman's computer and had been deposited into the arcade game as well. When Iceman was subsequently blasted into the game as well, he materialized next to Jameson and, as the video cabinet was grabbed by the crane in the real world, the maze inside the game shook. After they were freed and appeared in the junkyard's compactor, Jameson and Iceman fled the deadly machine before it crushed them. Jameson immediately blamed his predicament on Iceman and his Spider-Friends ally, who had been there battling Videoman, and promised a scathing editorial against them, only to have his mouth webbed up.

(Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends cartoon episode - "Spider-Man Unmasked!" - BTS) - After the Sandman learned of his identity as Spider-Man, Peter Parker had a nightmare in which J. Jonah Jameson appeared and swore that Spider-Man was finished before firing Parker.

Comments: Created by Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott and Marvel Productions, Ltd. (see Appearances list for list of artists involved).

William Woodson was the credited (voice) actor in both Spider-Man (1981) and Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends.

His stats are based on his 616 version. Mortimer is the only family shown, so who knows if there is a John Jameson in this universe.

Also, in "Lizards, Lizards, Everywhere," we see Spider-Man free Jameson from the snake but the office is still full of alligators. I guess when the Lizard was defeated, they went away on their own?

Profile by David Lawrence.

CLARIFICATIONS:
Earth-8107's J. Jonah Jameson has no known connections to:


J. Jonah Jameson robot

A robot built by Doctor Doom and used to replace the Daily Bugle publisher, the J. Jonah Jameson robot was designed to look and act exactly like the real Jameson but its friendly attitude and kindness tipped Spider-Man off on the switch.

It was presumably shut down when Doom fled New York.




--Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Doctor Prescribes Doom"


images: (without ads)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Unfathomable Professor Gizmo" (main image & white tuxedo)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Doctor Prescribes Doom" (headshot with mouth agape & J. Jonah Jameson robot)
Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends cartoon episode, "The Origin of the Spider-Friends" (headshot with white mustache)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Bubble, Bubble, Oil & Trouble" (on phone & standing with cigar)
Spider-Man
cartoon episode, "Dr. Doom, Master of the World" (refusing photos & headshot with cigar)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Lizards, Lizards, Everywhere" (in green suit wrapped in snake)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Curiosity Killed the Spider-Man" (pirate costume & hanging from web in green suit)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Carnival of Crime" (headshot in green suit & headshot with phone)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Revenge of the Green Goblin" (with crumbling newspapers & rescued by Spider-Man)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Sidewinder Strikes" (headshot in bowler hat)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Hunter & the Hunted" (carried off by Ka-Zar & in net with Mortimer)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Cannon of Doom" (winter gear & pajamas)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Capture of Captain America" (angry behind desk & saluting)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Wrath of the Sub-Mariner" (hanging from flagpole)
Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends cartoon episode, "The Origin of the Iceman" (trapped in video game)


Appearances:
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Bubble, Bubble, Oil & Trouble" (September 12, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Dr. Doom, Master of the World" (September 19, 1981) -
Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Lizards, Lizards, Everywhere" (September 26, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Curiosity Killed the Spider-Man" (October 3, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Sandman is Coming" (October 10, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Pied Piper of New York Town" (October 24, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Doctor Prescribes Doom" (October 31, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Carnival of Crime" (November 7, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Revenge of the Green Goblin" (November 14, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Triangle of Evil" (November 21, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The A-B-C's of D-O-O-M" (November 28, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Sidewinder Strikes" (December 5, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Hunter & the Hunted" (December 12, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Incredible Shrinking Spider-Man" (December 19, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Unfathomable Professor Gizmo" (December 26, 1981) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Cannon of Doom" (January 2, 1982) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Capture of Captain America" (January 9, 1982) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Doom Report" (January 16, 1982) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Web of Nephilia" (January 23, 1982) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "The Vulture Has Landed" (February 13, 1982) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man cartoon episode, "Wrath of the Sub-Mariner" (February 20, 1982) - Creighton Barnes, Doug Booth, Francis X. Feighan, Donald F. Glut, Jack Hanrahan, Christy Marx, Larry Parr, Jeffrey Scott (writers), Lyle Beddes, Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Larry Huber, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Keith Sargent, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bill Wray (layouts), Mario Piluso (layouts, storyboards), Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Henry Tucker (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Kay Wright (animation directors)
Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends cartoon episode, "The Origin of the Iceman" (September 18, 1982) - Donald F. Glut (writer), Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Tom Tholen, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bob Foster (layouts), Jan Green, Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Will Meugniot, Dick Sebast, Bob Schaffer, Don Shepard, Hank Tucker, Warren Tufts (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Arthur Vitello (animation directors)
Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends cartoon episode, "Spider-Man Unmasked!" (September 17, 1983) - Michael Reaves (writer), Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Tom Tholen, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bob Foster (layouts), Jan Green, Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Will Meugniot, Dick Sebast, Bob Schaffer, Don Shepard, Hank Tucker, Warren Tufts (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Arthur Vitello (animation directors)
Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends cartoon episode, "The Origin of the Spider-Friends" (October 15, 1983) - Donald Glut (writer), Bruce Bennett, Norm Cabral, Dan Faucett, Neil Galloway, Greg Garcia, Gary Graham, Rick Graham, Karl Hepworth, Stuart Heimdall, Elaine Hultgren, Boyd Kirkland, Debra Pugh, Dave Sharp, Roy Smith, Tom Tholen, Grant Wilson, Roy Wilson, Bob Foster (layouts), Jan Green, Rick Hoberg, Cullen Houghtaling, Larry Houston, Sherman Labby, Will Meugniot, Dick Sebast, Bob Schaffer, Don Shepard, Hank Tucker, Warren Tufts (storyboards), Gerry Chiniquy, Steve Clark, John Gibbs, Sid Marcus, Bob Richardson, Nelson Shin, Arthur Vitello (animation directors)


First Posted: 10/23/2019
Last updated: 10/23/2019

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